Thyroid and MS ... and Bint!

Submitted by JaneK on Fri, 2017-12-29 07:03

Well, Christmas is over, again and, as usual, i couldn’t be more pleased, it was lovely, but i always exhausting, busy and expensive, although since we began giving quite large donations to different charities instead of some presents, it’s easier and feels so much less wasteful.

Before Christmas i gave in and went to the GP.  i’ve begun to realise my hypotension and fatigue shouldn’t be as terrible nor written off as MS just MS! i’m quite well overal, but MS is an easy get out for GP’s. Previous thyroid redings, 4 years ago, were ‘normal‘ at 10,  I questioned him closely and learned normal is 8 to well over 200, in that surgery’s readings. He refused to admit my thyroid is giving up, but i’m having the test again in 3 weeks.  I’m sure it will be normal again and I may need to buy thyroxin, but resent the extra cost and don’t like taking meds without supervision,but need to regain strength.  I’m not overweight, which works against me, i would rather be overweight than constantly exhausted. Does anyone have any advice for me?

Oh, and i really hope 2018 brings health and happiness for all  CAPers, past and present!

Hi Jane!

Happy New Year to you (and to everybody here).

Your idea about giving money to charity instead of presents to people is very thoughtful. I have a charity here in my wallet that accepts donations from anywhere.

Anyway, back to the business of ill health.

Many years ago a very close friend of mine was diagnosed with an underactive thyroid. There was not particularly any good news about that accept that at least he had a diagnosis. The other so-called good news at the time was that he would be on free prescriptions for life. That is irrelevant to us here in Wales because all prescriptions are free anyway.

Now this is relevant to you. My understanding about the reasons that he would be entitled to free prescriptions for life (and I am not a doctor) are that once you are taking thyroxine your thyroid gland ceases to produce thyroxine at all and you are then committed to taking prescription thyroxine for life. I don't believe that one can treat thyroxine as if it were vitamin D or doxycycline.

Quite a few years ago now, I was going out with a bint that was also diagnosed with an underactive thyroid gland. It was quite a task getting the dosage correct and balanced. I believe that a sequence of blood tests were involved once she was actually on thyroxine to measure the concentrations in serum.

As I say, I am not a doctor, so my advice must be taken as that coming from a lay person.

Good luck Janet.


“Don't believe everything you read on the internet.”

―    Abraham Lincoln

Hi Chloé!

If you type in "bint etymology" into a Google search page, you'll get a pretty good description.

You have heard of bin Laden; well that literally translates "Son of Laden".

Example: 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haya_bint_Hussein

A crisp and effective word. One can convey just so much feeling into it. It is one of my favourite and most used words. It can be used when speaking to Arabic royalty or it can simply be used to say something of a more derogatory tone to anyone of the fairer sex, e.g. "You stupid bint!"

Even a Cockney like me always pronounces the T perfectly.

I do hope that helps.

G.

“Don't believe everything you read on the internet.”

―    Abraham Lincoln

Chloe, I am so glad that I could be of assistance. I hope that I actually have been of assistance. I am not sure of how CPn affects you or of any disabilities that you may have. If, like me, your mobility is severely impaired, just make sure that you are in a car that has its engine running and has good acceleration if you do happen to use the phrase "You stupid bint!".

I recommend that until you are fully familiar with its usage and repercussions, you experiment initially via internet chat or long-distance telephone calls. There are some very funny bints out there; it's hard to tell which ones are going to turn nasty.

As it happens, in isolation, the word bint should be neutral. It can be equally complementary. I have previously used it here to describe an attractive young lady. My description was "A fit-looking bint".  She responded out of nowhere in the spirit that it was meant in. She announced herself here with "Chuckling bint here. What can I do for you?"

Please do keep me posted.

Image removed.

G.

“Don't believe everything you read on the internet.”

―    Abraham Lincoln

D W

An interesting language, Arabic. My father could speak it fluently. He was once in a lift in London when two Egyptians entered. They spoke together in Arabic, not knowing that my father was fluent. They were commenting on my father’s moustache, which was very well developed. One said ‘truly the grandfather of moustaches.’ My father replied in Arabic. ‘Yes, it took some time to grow.’ Then they all laughed and had a pleasant conversation. Bint was a word he used quite frequently.

D W - [Myalgia and hypertension (typically 155/95.) Began (2003) taking doxycycline and macrolide and later adding metronidazole. No medication now. Morning BP typically 110/75]

Maybe ...

Just maybe, there is some commonality here?

I too speak fluent Arabic ... but alas only that one singular word.

I too have been in a lift in London ... many more times than one singular occasion.

I too have spoken with someone in a lift in London that was Arabic and had a fine moustache. It was a bint ... so no matter how tight I shut my eyes, I couldn't unsee the horror I'd seen.

Understanding is a virtue. At that moment, I understood the virtue and value of a burka.

Image removed.

G.

“Don't believe everything you read on the internet.”

―    Abraham Lincoln

Yes, it’taken a while for me to look and earned a good laugh, now I have, which, i’m sure is better medicine than thyroxin! In my world,  the word ‘Bint’ was just derogatory, it’s now, firmly, in my  lexicon! And, i promise, i’ll use it well  and often! It’s great to be bilingual!

MS symptoms from 2001, DX RRMS in 2008, following, a change of hospital who sent me for an MRI, precipitated by some sight loss. Took Interferons, on and off. Prescribed  chemo infusions to slow pro

Who needs thyroxine when laughter is in abundance?

On these pages, we have seen the works of various artists. Here is a link to a wonderful and colourful street artist.

https://goo.gl/images/HKJrSd

http://www.isupportstreetart.com/artist/binty-bint/

Remember folks, you saw it here first ... at cpnhelp.org

Image removed.

G.

“Don't believe everything you read on the internet.”

―    Abraham Lincoln

Chloe ...

Yes, the meaning is all in the preface.

I will let you into a secret.
Not 10 yards from this reclining chair from which I type this message, a sleeping bint lays a slumber; oblivious that her name is about to spring to fame. Yes, she has an email address of supabint@......... Yes, what more fitting a name for someone that has to stand next to supaguy@...... ? I know that there are others here that would say "Poor bint" having to put up with him!

When all is said and done, it's just a word. "Man" is not offensive ... but "Stupid man" certainly is. Referring to a woman as "Woman" can be just as offensive. Worse still, calling them by the wrong name can definitely invite wrath. I've learnt just to stick to "Darling", "Babe" or "Hun". In fact that last one was particularly useful when referring to a long ago ex-girlfriend's mum (who was German).


“Don't believe everything you read on the internet.”

―    Abraham Lincoln