Antibiotics

Agents used to kill micro-organisms.

Cpn Treatment Information

Submitted by Jim K on Wed, 2005-10-05 17:52

The links below will take you to pages with specific information involved in the treatment of Cpn.

Diagnostic Testing For Cpn
Information on serological testing and the problems of this in Cpn.
Combination Antibiotic Treatment Protocols for Cpn
Links to pages on the current versions of Vanderbilt/Stratton and Wheldon Protocols for treating Cpn infections in various diseases.
Experts Comments

Commentary and interviews  with various experts in treating Cpn which help guide and inform about various facets of treatment.
Treatment Reactions
Information on some of the kinds and sources of treatment reactions one can expect on combination antibiotic protocols in treating Cpn, including cytokine reactions, endotoxin reactions, secondary porphyria and other reactions. These are often lumped under the term "herx," an inaccurate term and not as useful as really understanding what's going on.

 

The Basics Page

Submitted by mrhodes40 on Wed, 2005-09-14 14:49

Hello and Welcome!

This site is focused on treatment of chronic disease like Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) and Fibromyalgia (FMS) an many other diseases with antibiotics. Recent research indicates that Chlamydia Pneumoniae (CPn) plays a role in these diseases.

Here are the basics that make it easier for people new to the site to get going (if your brain isn't ready for even this much right now-- we've all been there-- read Cpn Simple first):

Is this a sexually transmitted disease? No. this is chlamydia pneumoniae, a bacteria that can cause pneumonia. It may soon be called chlamydiophilia (meaning in the family of).

Is chlamydia pneumoniae (CPn) rare?

Pilot study to examine effect of antibiotic therapy on MRI outcomes in RRMS

Submitted by mrhodes40 on Mon, 2005-09-05 13:38

Journal of Neurological Science 2005 Jul 15;234(1-2):87-91
"Pilot study to examine the effect of antibiotic therapy on MRI outcomes in RRMS"

The rights to this paper are owned by Elsevier. the whole citation can be purchased
here

Abstract:

Sriram S, Yao SY, Stratton C, Moses H, Narayana PA, Wolinsky JS.

Department of Pathology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37212, USA. subramaniam.sriram@vanderbilt.edu

This trial examined the safety and possible MRI and clinical effects of anti-chlamydial antibiotic therapy in relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS). Newly diagnosed MS patients were selected to participate if they showed Chlamydia pneumoniae gene in their CSF and had one or more enhancing lesions on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). After a 4-month run in phase of monthly MRI, patients were randomized to receive rifampin (300 mg twice daily) and azithromycin (500 mg every other day) for 6 months or placebo (PBO). Patients then had monthly MRI on therapy and two additional scans on months 12 and 14. Lumbar punctures were repeated between months 7 and 8 and within 2 weeks of termination of the study. Data on 4 patients on treatment and 4 on PBO were available for analysis. The primary outcome measure of showing a beneficial effect on enhancing lesions was not met. However, there was a significant difference in brain parenchymal fraction loss favoring those patient receiving antibiotics compared with PBO (p< or =0.02). Three of the four patients on antibiotic therapy cleared the organism from the CSF by month 12; in the PBO group one patient cleared the organism. The reduction in atrophy in patients receiving antibiotics must be viewed with caution, due to the small number of patients studied.

Antibiotic treatment of arthritus

Submitted by Jim K on Wed, 2005-08-24 20:33

Promise of Tetracycline Antibiotic for Osteoarthritis
14 Jul 2005   

Study Shows Effectiveness of Doxycycline in Slowing Disease Progression. A tetracycline antibiotic, doxycycline, has been successfully used to treat a wide-range of bacterial infections. In addition to its effects as an antibiotic, doxycycline has other actions as a drug and, in laboratory studies with animals and with human tissue, can inhibit the degradation of cartilage in a way that could be useful for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). OA is a common form of arthritis associated with pain and disability related to the breakdown of cartilage, the tissue in the joint that absorbs shock and promotes smooth movement.

On the strength of preclinical evidence, a team of rheumatologists affiliated with six clinical research centers across the United States conducted the first long-term clinical trial to determine the benefits of doxycycline in the treatment of OA-particularly, OA of the knee. Their findings, featured in the July 2005 issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism ( http://www.interscience.wiley.com/journal/arthritis), suggest that doxycycline may slow the progression of joint damage and point to the need for further research into the drug's effect on the signs and symptoms of this disease.

Comments by David Wheldon in response to questions about choice of antibiotics in his protocal versus the Vanderbilt protocal:

Submitted by Jim K on Tue, 2005-08-23 22:21

I believe that Stratton and co-workers used a beta-lactam (penicillin, amoxycillin or similar) to attack the infectious stage
(elementary body) of the organism. They did some in vitro work to support this, which they should publish, because it's
fundamental. I reasoned that, as culture was so rare in persistent human infections, the numbers of elementary bodies would
be small. Also, any elementary body entering a phagosome in a cell containing bacterial protein-synthesis inhibitors would be
doomed, as the organism needs to fabricate proteins immediately to survive. Coupled with this was a native gut-reaction that
people would buy into the idea more readily if there were fewer antibiotics. And, further, that one is taught at med school
never to combine cidal and static agents. In the higher levels of microbiology that's not always true, but basically you just
want people to believe you and treat, as early as possible, and the more complications you put in their way the more difficult
that is.