Arthritus

Inflammation of joints

Essential Observations by Dr. Charles Stratton on Chlamydia Pneumoniae Infection and Disease

Submitted by Jim K on Tue, 2006-09-12 16:57

I am very excited to present the following article that summarizes Dr. Stratton's recent observations on Chlamydia pneumoniae infection. Putting it together has contributed greatly to my own understanding of Cpn as well as to my appreciation of Dr. Stratton's generosity with his time, and his great depth of knowledge of this area. Thanks to him for his contribution.

Jim K

Recent observations by Dr

Recent observations by Dr. Charles Stratton on Chlamydia Pneumoniae (Cpn) Infection

Diseases associated with Cpn: the exhaustive list

Submitted by Jim K on Sun, 2006-01-22 08:41

I have culled from Mitchell & Stratton patent #6,884,784 an exhaustive list of diseases where Cpn has been implicated as a possible cause or co-factor (reference: Mitchell & Stratton patent #6,884,784):

Diseases where an association has been discovered between chronic Chlamydia infection of body fluids and/or tissues with several disease syndromes of previously unknown etiology in humans which respond to unique antichlamydial regimens include:

Editorial comment: Strong findings from their research. If you have any of these it suggests to me that at least an empirical course of the combination antibiotic therapy is strongly indicated, with or without serology.


Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA)
Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)
Interstitial Cystitis (IC)
Fibromyalgia (FM)
Autonomic nervous dysfunction (AND neural-mediated hypotension);
Pyoderma Gangrenosum (PG)
Chronic Fatigue (CF) and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS).

Antibiotic treatment of arthritus

Submitted by Jim K on Wed, 2005-08-24 20:33

Promise of Tetracycline Antibiotic for Osteoarthritis
14 Jul 2005   

Study Shows Effectiveness of Doxycycline in Slowing Disease Progression. A tetracycline antibiotic, doxycycline, has been successfully used to treat a wide-range of bacterial infections. In addition to its effects as an antibiotic, doxycycline has other actions as a drug and, in laboratory studies with animals and with human tissue, can inhibit the degradation of cartilage in a way that could be useful for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). OA is a common form of arthritis associated with pain and disability related to the breakdown of cartilage, the tissue in the joint that absorbs shock and promotes smooth movement.

On the strength of preclinical evidence, a team of rheumatologists affiliated with six clinical research centers across the United States conducted the first long-term clinical trial to determine the benefits of doxycycline in the treatment of OA-particularly, OA of the knee. Their findings, featured in the July 2005 issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism ( http://www.interscience.wiley.com/journal/arthritis), suggest that doxycycline may slow the progression of joint damage and point to the need for further research into the drug's effect on the signs and symptoms of this disease.