New, and of course, have some questions

Hello.  A very interesting sight.  I find my way here after what feels like a good 10+ years of fairly baffling chronic illness.  I'm 52-years old, and recently  I’ve been getting arthritic pains in my fingers and knees, hips and lower back.  These tend to flare up on me, then go away just as inexplicably.  I also have a sinus and lung infection that never seems to go away, and flares up frequently.  IBSi has also been a problem for about 10-years.  I also get scalp bumps/pimples frequently, and diverticulitis and hemorrhoids have recently been problems for me.  I’ve almost accepted that these chronic feelings of illness are just something I deal with.  I can still go to work, but some days would rather not. 

 Anyway, I was intrigued by the cpni discussed here, and so have started on NACi (1000-2000mg daily) for the last 4-weeks as this seemed like a safe enough and easy enough to use as a diagnostic as well as being able to counter a possible proliferation of Elementary Bodies.  I do feel worse after taking these (not until a few hours after), feeling slightly like I have the flu (I know this is a possible sign of a cpn load), though nothing too overwhelming.  After being on NAC for four weeks now some of my chronic issues seem better.  Aches in my joints are less noticeable, and my diarrhea is virtually gone.  In fact, by bowels haven’t felt this sound in many years.  My lungs and sinuses are also improved, and my scalp issues and diverticulitis have subsided quite a bit.

At this point, I plan on continuing with the NAC regimen as I highly doubt my doctor would prescribe the amount/duration of antibioticsi recommended by the various protocolsi.  I’m in Canada and my doctor is pretty orthodox. 

I know many here have MS and are treating or self-treating with the CAPi out of dire necessity.  My situation is not that acute, and I’m wondering if my treatment should be as extreme?  Also, if I were to go on the CAP, how could I source the needed medicine.  


Thanks to all here for their openess and courage.

Darcy

I can address one of your questions pretty simply.  Yes, if you have a cpni infection, your treatment is the same as those who are treating for MSi, which is the same as for those who are treating for rosaceai, or arthritis, or fatigue, or.... whatever.

What you're killing is a cpn infection and the treatment for that is the same for everyone.  A 'mild' case might take less time to clear from your body than a lifelong, entrenched infection, but the treatment for killing it is pretty much the same across the board.

The difference between what we do and what we are capable of doing would suffice to solve most of the world’s problems. Mohandas Gandhi

Forget your native medical association indoctrinated quack - look for a doctor, probably foreign born, who is open to science rather than the medical industrial complex induced dogma.

The NACi prevents reinfection, but does little to cure the infection, repair damage, etc. Also, might try 'Jarrow's NAC Sustained' that is time released and probably milder on the tummy. But the other suppliments/vitaminsi are needed as well to assist your body fight the disease...

The relief in symptoms is probably your immunei system (the type 'O' blood type has the most robust immune system of the blood types...) fighting the infection and the NAC preventing re-infection. If this works stay with it - however you may reach a point where your immune system can only go so far and need the 'kill-off' power of the cocktail of ABxi's in CAPi.

We find consulations, we learn tricks with which we deceive ourselves, but the essential thing - the way - we do not find. Listen to the river...

Thanks for both of your responses.

Regarding whether NACi cures or prevents the infection:  If the Elementary Body phase is comprised of these free-ranging cpns looking for an intercellulari home and, once having found the home and then replicated inside the cell, burst the cell and go a-roving again as EBs, then wouldn't the NAC not only prevent the initial infrection, but the spread of the EBs after they have reproduced inside the cell?

In chronic infection reticular bodies in their endosomes are able to pass directly from host cell to host cell.

D W - [Myalgia and hypertension">i (typically 155/95.) Began (2003) taking doxycycline and macrolide and later adding metronidazolei. No medication now. Morning BP typically 110/75]

So if the reticular bodies are able to pass directly from host cell to host cell while remaining in their endosomes, what is the point or purpose of those RBs bursting the endosome and surrounding cell entirely to release the EBs?  This cell bursting and EB-release is part of the cycle of cpni, no?

The standard explanation of EBi/RB/EB alternation describes the situation in an acute infection of a naive host (and in vitro cell culture.)

 

In chronic infection the organism appears to replicate in a much more stealthy manner. Chl pneumoniae, under chronic stress conditions, dramatically curtails EB production.

D W - [Myalgia and hypertension">i (typically 155/95.) Began (2003) taking doxycycline and macrolide and later adding metronidazolei. No medication now. Morning BP typically 110/75]

So for some reason, in a chronic infection, the reticulate body will not deem conditions right to let its host cell die and release EBs into the blood stream (as stated in the About CPNi section of this forum)?  And also, then, in chronic infection, the RB will not convert to the cryptic, hibernating form, but instead move from cell to cell inside its endosome as a RB?  Or is this stealthy RB replication considered hiberation?

This is getting Byzantine, and life is so short.

D W - [Myalgia and hypertension">i (typically 155/95.) Began (2003) taking doxycycline and macrolide and later adding metronidazolei. No medication now. Morning BP typically 110/75]

A bit Byzantine, no doubt.  I'm just thinking out loud trying to figure out the stages.  Thanks for your responses.

The one thing I don't get, though, is if the EBs are dramatically curtailed in chronic infection, why do people feel so bad when first taking NACi?  

According to Charles Strattoni, quite a lot of EBs never make it into host cells, but just lie dormant. It may be that many of these are imperfect. One could speculate that some EBs get trapped in fibrous tissue. EBs can be considered as seeds which only germinate when they find the right substrate. As EBs are metabolically inactive they could remain dormant for decades, ready to be opened by NAC.

 

One piece of evidence to support this is that the symptoms associated with NAC are primarily respiratory, in the very sites where the bacterium first caused an infection in a naive host, suggesting that EBs were liberated in great numbers early in the disease.

 

In my own case I had acute then chronic sinusitis as a child. It eventually faded, but when I took NAC 30 years later I had a reprise of symptoms which lasted about three weeks.

 

D W - [Myalgia and hypertension">i (typically 155/95.) Began (2003) taking doxycycline and macrolide and later adding metronidazolei. No medication now. Morning BP typically 110/75]

Curiouser and curiouser.  

This disease is a bit Byzantine.

Funnily enough Darcy, I never did feel bad: I just got an awfully runny nose...................Sarah

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MSi in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

To each of us our own endotoxic reaction I suppose.  Like snowflakes.

If you read old posts here, you'll find that's pretty much what we tell everyone.  The treatment is the same, but everyone's reactions, response time, recovery, etc., will be unique.

The difference between what we do and what we are capable of doing would suffice to solve most of the world’s problems. Mohandas Gandhi

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