MediTest
Submitted by Sarah on Thu, 2006-12-21 13:41

And I'll say it again, but in my own topic: hair is ectoderm and the brain and spinal chord right down to the peripheral nervous system are neuroectoderm, or neural ectoderm to some, the result of the ectoderm turning inwards in the early stages of foetal development.  I was taking 5000mcg of oral methylcyanocobalimin until about three months ago, now I take triple that at least and my hair has started growing exponentially, so I hope something is happening to my brain cells as well.  Although it was my idea, David thinks it very sound, so told me to keep on with it.  This link from the University of North Carolina is fascinating.....Sarah http://tinyurl.com/yy53n3  Edit, the day after the night before: should have written "Spinal cord" and "Methylcobalimin."  Go to the back of the class. An Itinerary in Light and Shadow.Wheldon regime since August 2003, for very aggressive SPMS.  Intermittent therapy after one year. 2006 still take this, now two weeks every three months.  EDSS was about 7, now 2. United Kingdom.      

Whoops, "Spinal Chord" maybe means that I ought to get back to playing my 'cello more!.......Sarah 

An Itinerary in Light and Shadow.Wheldon regime since August 2003, for very aggressive SPMS.  Intermittent therapy after one year. 2006 still take this, now two weeks every three months.  EDSS was about 7, now 2. United Kingdom.

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

Maybe I am the lucky one whose Cpn settled on the inverted ectoderm.   I'll take note of the methylcyanocobalimin for future reference.

Michele:  on Wheldon protocol since 1st May 2006 for a variety of long standing ailments including IBS, sinusitis, alopecia, asthma, peripheral neuropathy, also spokesperson for Ella started Wheldon CAP 16th March 2006 for RRMS

Michèle (UK) GFA: Wheldon CAP 1st May 2006. Daily Doxy, Azi MWF, metro pulse.

Sarah, I just wanted to let you know that after reading all your info about B12, brain and hair, I went downstairs and gave myself a B12 shot..  I hate doing it and often put it off.  Thanks for spurring me to action.

Kristin

David and Kristin, Married Forever, on CAP for FM and CFS with Dr. P. Sacramento, CA

David and Kristin, Married Forever, on CAP for FM and CFS with Dr. P. Sacramento, CA

Whoops again!  I must have a liking for words with too many syllables as well as just letters.  It should of course, be methylcobalimin, not methylcyanocobalimin! Methylcobalimin is preferred when taken orally because it is more easily absorbed.

Kristin, I hate injections as well, especially the thought of doing it myself, which is why I take the stuff orally.  I use this, from Vitacost: http://www.vitacost.com/JarrowFormulasMethylB12  Both of you, the pictures are good, though, aren't they?...........Sarah 

An Itinerary in Light and Shadow.Wheldon regime since August 2003, for very aggressive SPMS.  Intermittent therapy after one year. 2006 still take this, now two weeks every three months.  EDSS was about 7, now 2. United Kingdom.

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

Ok, Sarah I did a google search on it and found nothing, so thought maybe is was something really new with almonds in it but now I know its B12 I'll continue taking it religiously.

Michele:  on Wheldon protocol since 1st May 2006 for a variety of long standing ailments including IBS, sinusitis, alopecia, asthma, peripheral neuropathy, also spokesperson for Ella started Wheldon CAP 16th March 2006 for RRMS

Michèle (UK) GFA: Wheldon CAP 1st May 2006. Daily Doxy, Azi MWF, metro pulse.

And the almonds Image removed..........Sarah

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.