MRI - FIRST RESULTS

Hi guys! :)

This is Gisel.la. I just came back from the CEMCAT visit. It seems my last MRI had 9 new lesions, so I will be considered from a low to a medium load of lesions. 

I explained I quitted the Copaxone and I started the Protocol. They insisted into going back to this Copaxone. 

I am still under the shock. I guess I expected no lesions or a lower number of them. Have anyone any advise to give? Is it normal at this lenght of Protocol?

Thanks a lot for any advise, info or personal experience! :)

I am back from the shock. O.o

More info about it for in case anyone can deduct something better. I am not sure why, but I keep on 'mistrusting' the neurologists, since their main focus point was how bad the antibiotics are, and who prescribed them to me. 

I had a visit with the oftalmologist before to enter the neurologist visit, I told him about the C. Pneumoniae Protocol, and he run to explain it to the Neurologists, even after I asked him not to, as I pretended to see their reaction on the results before any other information could affect. 

I guess he forgot about any patient confidentiality. (1rst shock).

Once I entered the Neurologist visit, she was completely affected by the news. She kept on repeating about my flora. Really? (2nd Shock).

I told her I was on Probiotics. I even tried to remember the name: Saccharomyces Boulardii + MOS, recomended to patients under a long antibiotic treatment. She did not even tried to discover the name under the Probiotics. (3rd Shock).

She kept on asking who prescrived the antibiotics to me. I told her I bought them Online... Oh man... was this an underestimation face? (4th Shock).

At this point, I felt completely stupid. Did they discover something about Antibiotics they were not telling me about? Any weird step into human evolution? Something bigger? Why noone asked me about the Protocol and its theories... To be or not to be... so many questions!

Does it sound as a conspiracy movie? I am starting to doubt about my madness... O.o

Anyhow, I really need any of your help here. I am not sure I fully understand the last 3 MRI's. So here Google tries its best to translate its content:

- 24.VIII.2016 - 

MRI brain contrast (24.08.2016 / 13: 21: 38)

Reason for study:
Assessment of a patient with a history of having presented a first clinical episode suggestive of having a demyelinating origin of the right eye. METOMS 2B protocol, basal.

Technique:
MRI of the spinal cord was performed by means of T1 and T2-weighted sequences oriented in the sagittal and transverse planes, before and after the intravenous administration of contrast.
We do not have previous studies to compare.

Findings:
The study reveals the presence of multiple hyperintense focal lesions of nodular / ovoid morphology and variable size, which in total number slightly less than 50 affect the juxta-subcortical and periventricular white matter of both cerebral hemispheres including the corpus callosum as well as periphery of the brainstem and white matter of both cerebral hemispheres.
Mild and global dilation of the ventricular system that maintains a proportion with the arachnoid grooves that cover both cerebral convexities.
The spinal study reveals the presence of multiple hyperintense focal lesions in the T2 sequences that affect the lateral and posterior cords of the cervical spine. The medullary cord has conserved thickness with cone in habitual disposition. Free perimedular arachnoid spaces. Osteoligamentous structures of normal appearance highlighting a slight correction of the physiological cervical lordosis. After administration of intravenous contrast medium, uptake is observed in 4 brain lesions and 1 is mild in the cervical cord.

Conclusion:
Multiple demyelinating lesions with a low lesion load affect the white matter of both cerebral hemispheres including the corpus callosum and cerebellum as well as the cervical spinal cord, identifying signs of inflammatory activity at the cerebral and spinal levels.
The characteristics of the lesions are typical and meet spatial and temporal dissemination criteria, being from the radiological point of view highly suggestive of the presence of multiple sclerosis.

- 06.IV.2017 - 

MRI of the brain amb contrast (01.04.2017 / 06: 28: 02)

REASON FOR THE STUDY:
Assessment of a patient with a history of having presented a first clinical episode suggestive of having a demyelinating origin of the right eye. Protocol METOMS 2B, 1st year.

TECHNIQUE
Cerebral MRI is performed by means of T1 and T2-weighted sequences oriented in the 3 planes of space, before and after administration of intravenous contrast.
The current exploration is compared with the previous one of 08/24/2016.

FINDINGS:
The ventricular system conserves morphology, size and proportion with the arachnoid grooves that cover both cerebral convexities, without significant changes with respect to the previous study.
The comparative study demonstrates the appearance of 6 new lesions in the context of a low lesion load affecting the juxta-subcortical and periventricular white matter of both cerebral hemispheres including the corpus callosum as well as the periphery of the brainstem and white matter of both cerebellar hemispheres.
After intravenous contrast administration, three of the lesions show a nodular appearance.
Midline centered with visible basal and peritroncular cisterns. Occipito-cervical horn of normal characteristics.

CONCLUSION:
Evidence of 6 new lesions with signs of inflammatory activity in three of them.

- 25.IV.2018 -

MRI of the brain amb contrast (05.04.2018 / 03: 18: 38)

Reason for the study:
Brain MRI in a patient with MS, who started treatment with Copaxone in January of 2017.

Technique:
T1-weighted sequences (before and after intravenous administration of contrast), T2 and magnetic susceptibility in the sagittal and transverse planes for cerebral study have been practiced.
The current exam is compared with the one performed 3 months after the start of treatment on April 1, 2017.

Findings:
The current examination continues to show multiple and small focal lesions with demyelinating characteristics, which total slightly greater than 50, affect the juxta-subcortical and periventricular white matter of both cerebral hemispheres, eltronco encephalic and the white matter of both cerebellar hemispheres. In relation to the previous study, approximately 9 of these lesions are new, with 8 of them in the subcortical and periventricular white matter of both cerebral hemispheres, and 9a in the right cerebellar hemisphere.
The characteristics of these lesions do not change after intravenous contrast administration.
The ventricular system maintains a global size and morphology within normality. No parenchymal alterations not attributable to multiple sclerosis are observed.

Conclusion:
Cerebral MRI of control in patient affects MS under treatment with Copaxone, which shows multiple demyelinating lesions (moderate lesion load), which affect the white matter of both cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres and brainstem, 9 of them new in relation to the study previous.
No signs of inflammatory activity are observed in any of these new lesions.

Thanks for any advise. :)

Gisel·la

(ONGOING PROTOCOL: 1 year and 2 months following Stratton/Wheldon Protocol)

MS Diagnosed: 21.IX.2016

 

Gisel.la, the first thing to ask is how long before starting cpn treatment did you have the previous scan?  The lesions, or most of them anyway, might have been before you started treatment.

I have only ever had three scans: one before and two after.  I started cpn treatment less than a week after the first scan, leaving very little time for new lesions to develop.  I have had no new lesion since.  The main thing to think of is that people were diagnosed with MS long before  MRI scans came along. 
How are your various syndromes linked to MS now, as compared to before you started treatment?  I was told after my first scan that my life as an artist was over.  Well, David was told, along with being told that he ought to think about a nursing home for me.  Since I am now painting probably better than ever, if I had never had another scan, I would assume that the cpn treatment had worked.
From what you have said, you seem to be on the road to recovery yourself: you are an intelligent woman who must know that if various bits of you are starting to work better, you have stopped the downward spiral....................Sarah
Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

Sarah... you are always in my SOS's screams. It has been such a surrealistic visit. Everyday I am a step closer to write the Netflix serie... 

I am trying to understand the importance of having active/non active lesions. When was your first improvement result, at the end of the 3 years treatment? 

I will keep on the Protocol, as expected. My wonder is, should I start with this Copaxone also? OMG! 

I sort of translated the MRI's result in the upper comment, I tried to dive into it, but it is still not clear...

Thanks a lot for the answer. :)

Gisel·la

(ONGOING PROTOCOL: 1 year and 2 months following Stratton/Wheldon Protocol)

MS Diagnosed: 21.IX.2016

 

I am still trying to decide about the purpose of a non-inflammatory lesion, but at least I now know about the distance apart of your three scans and also how long you went before starting treatment.  I guess that you can only say the lesions date from after starting the treatment, if you started the treatment the very next day, which you didn't.

My improvement started as soon as I began doxycycline: about five days after getting the diagnosis.

I had better stop now in case I get caught up in the site renewal!.........................Sarah

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.
D W

I’m no radiologist, but I have heard it said that clinical symptoms are a better indicator of improvement or deterioration than MRI findings. An instance of this occurred during treatment of SPMS with alemtuzumab: the MRIs improved but the patients did not. [Coles AJ, Cox A, Le Page E et al. The window of therapeutic opportunity in multiple sclerosis: evidence from monoclonal antibody therapy J Neurol. 2006 Jan;253(1):98-108.]

 

Sarah began treatment within a few days of her first MRI, so there would have been no opportunity for new lesions to appear. Her second MRI after 6 months showed evaporation of most lesions.

 

Keep courage!

D W - [Myalgia and hypertension (typically 155/95.) Began (2003) taking doxycycline and macrolide and later adding metronidazole. No medication now. Morning BP typically 110/75]

Thanks for the explanations. It makes the day way more bearable. :)  

Gisel·la

(ONGOING PROTOCOL: 1 year and 2 months following Stratton/Wheldon Protocol)

MS Diagnosed: 21.IX.2016

 

MRIs, at least the ones they usually do on patients, aren't that thorough.  When I had MRIs, the radiologists kept on saying that they saw new lesions, but when my neurologist and I looked at the MRI images we couldn't see what they were was talking about.  Finally, on the last MRI I had, near the end of treatment, the radiologist pointed out one particular lesion as being new.  And indeed, when I looked at the previous MRI, it wasn't there.  But then I went back to MRIs prior to that, and one showed that same lesion.  (My neurologist was alarmed at first at the report of deterioration, but he looked at the images himself and agreed that the earlier MRI showed the same lesion.)

The cause of this is that, as I said, MRIs aren't that thorough.  They scan "slices" through the brain, and the thickness of each slice is such that not all the brain is covered: there are gaps between slices.  The MRI unit records this in the data it emits: there is one number for slice thickness, and another for slice spacing, and the second is usually a bit greater than the first.  This is just for cost savings: MRI machines can be programmed do do a completely thorough scan, but usually aren't.

The proof of new activity would be if your "new" lesions were "enhancing" (inflamed), but the report says none of them are.

Gisel.la,
So glad to read that David, who really, nows, believes in symptoms, in other words he believes you should listen to your body - who else knows it better? Believe in YOU! We all do!
Jane

MS symptoms from 2001, DX RRMS in 2008, following, a change of hospital who sent me for an MRI, precipitated by some sight loss. Took Interferons, on and off. Prescribed  chemo infusions to slow pro

Hi Gisel.la,
I’m not a physisian, but i was so pleased to see David talk of the importance of symptoms! There was a time when symptoms were the main thing medically, don’t ever believe others more than you believe yourself! Only you can know if the CAP makes you feel better, it certainly improves life for me! I won’t let anyone tell me it doesn’t. Tou’re here so you must be intelligent enough to work it out for yourself!
Jane
Jane

MS symptoms from 2001, DX RRMS in 2008, following, a change of hospital who sent me for an MRI, precipitated by some sight loss. Took Interferons, on and off. Prescribed  chemo infusions to slow pro

Gisel.la,
I’m so very pleased that David is so trusting of symptoms! I totally agree, but i’m not a physisian, he has knowledge, I do not! But i do know you are here, therefore, you are intelligent and courageous. Believe in yourself, don’t let others tell you that you are deteriorating when you know different! Believe in you, I believe in you!
Jane

MS symptoms from 2001, DX RRMS in 2008, following, a change of hospital who sent me for an MRI, precipitated by some sight loss. Took Interferons, on and off. Prescribed  chemo infusions to slow pro

Typo! David knows! But i can’t, even, work this new site!!

MS symptoms from 2001, DX RRMS in 2008, following, a change of hospital who sent me for an MRI, precipitated by some sight loss. Took Interferons, on and off. Prescribed  chemo infusions to slow pro

And neither of us can log on using our desktops. I can wiith my phone..........Sarah

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

Super sweet all these replies. :)

I keep on and getting used to the website. :D

I could log in through the one time reset password, though, the trouble come when trying to access My Account and I try to change the password. 

Gisel·la

(ONGOING PROTOCOL: 1 year and 2 months following Stratton/Wheldon Protocol)

MS Diagnosed: 21.IX.2016