MediTest
27 Apr 2018
Author
D W
Title

Medicine is ruled by fashion

Body

Medicine is ruled by fashion

Comments

What a nice post. You write so well one can see exactly what you mean. What a gift to share with everyone. I agree with you and the fashion changes somewhat quickly when inspired by market forces, example the dogma that anyone who has a brain will of course start immediately upon diagnosis a CRAB drug. The loud and long declaring of such information drowns out the other voices and ideas. Like noticing the vascular nature of the plaque and appreciating what it might mean.

You menitoned once that these vascular cuffs can be detected on retinal exam if I remember correctly. Do you suggest those of us who get our eyes looked at ought to request if such is seen? I asked my eye guy and he said, oh I see perivascular cuffs in many people's eyes. I don't think it means much....
Marie

On CAP since Sept '05 for MS, RA, Asthma, sciatica. EDSS at start 5.5.(early cane) Now 6 (cane full time) Originally on: Doxy 200, Azith 3x week, Tini cont. over summer '07, Revamp of protocol in Summer '08 by Stratton due to functional loss; clarithro

 "......., the very act of naked-eye observation was discarded."  This is the recent problem. Lab is the magic formula. Man can  appear  like a living death or zombie and when the laboratory markers are on "normal levels" he is then the only malingerer and  hypochondriac! Or psycho! No matter that a doctor doesn't know what to look for!

Jan

On CAPs:12/01/2005 till March 2013; 20 years CFS,IBS, fibromyalgia; about 10 years chronic sinusitis, laryngotracheitis, from 2002 hoarseness; from 2003 - v.s. lumbosacral meningoradiculitis, hypertension... 

When Freud's theory become the fashion, doctors began seeing symptoms as psychosomatic. Recently some brain scans showed that some women with FMS were truly in pain.

minocycline, azithromycine, metronidazole 2007-2009, chelation for lead poisoning, muscle pain, insomnia, interstitial cystitis (almost well), sinus, dry eyes, stiff neck, veins, hypothyroid, TMJ, hip joints (no longer hurt)

David, is this finding uncontroversial? 

[DW:] If that is the case, then what is the small inflamed blood-vessel doing in the centre of each plaque, the plaque itself following the course of the vessel, as had been noted by Rindfleisch in 1864?

I really know zero about this topic, but the following stuck in my mind when I dabbled in the Prineas and Barnett paper on new lesions:

Except for a very large lesion in one cerebral hemisphere in Case 7, the lesions were all relatively small (2-10mm in diameter), with curved or scalloped borders and usually no obvious perivascular relationship.

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/fulltext/107629227/HTMLSTART 

It could perhaps be worded more clearly, but I thought they were most likely saying that in their subjects, the new lesions generally didnt map well onto regions served by given vessels(?).

Thanks David, for the post on medical fashion.   I'm old enough I suppose to remember when doctors used to look for disease indicators when examining their patients.   I suggest that patients themselves and caring observers should take on this role in these days of 5 minute consultations.   If I have a role at all in the abx adverture my daughter is undertaking, it is that of making observations, making informed (and cautious) logical deductions and chronicling my observations.  This site is where I get the information that I need to make these logical deductions, so thank you all for sharing it with me.   Michele

Michèle (UK) GFA: Wheldon CAP 1st May 2006. Daily Doxy, Azi MWF, metro pulse.

D W

Eric, Vasculitis seems to be present as an early phenomenon, as evidenced by leakage shown in Gadolinium scans; in later lesions it disappears. A parallel situation exists in retinal vasculitis, which is also associated with early MS, but which also disappears with time. If I remember from my distant neuropathology days one may see elongated and curved plaques which probably once followed the course of a venule, but where no such vanule is seen. One might speculate that it has been obliterated by inflammation and the debris removed. These lesions may be tens of years old and one sees only a 'snapshot' of their history. Oppenheimer's Diagnostic Neuropathology remarks: 'Plaques examined in three dimensions often appear almond-shaped, with a vein running in the centre of the long axis, or they follow the sinuous curves of the veins they surround. They may have irregular perivenous finger-like projections.' To my mind the remarkable insight of Rindfleisch's observation is that vasculitis precedes white matter damage.

D W - [Myalgia and hypertension (typically 155/95.) Began (2003) taking doxycycline and macrolide and later adding metronidazole. No medication now. Morning BP typically 110/75]

David, Quoting myself from two private messages:

4/13/06 - "today I visited our internist to broach the cpnhelp treatment protocol to her.  She cut me off so quickly and sharply I was amazed.  I had expected a possibly chilly reception, but her reaction was vehement.  It seems she has a cousin with MS who is broke from spending all her money on a "cure" a few years ago.  She said the so-called "cure" had sounded good in theory, seemed to make alot of sense, but had failed, of course.  Because of her cousin's mishap, our internist now sits on a patients' rights committee.  There were two positives from the visit, though.  She became very interested when I mentioned the cpn-artery disease research/studies, and she assured me twice that she would read the Cpn Handbook, the articles, and the copy of "The Potbelly Syndrome" that I had brought her.  She had heard of the book, the theories behind it, and it was a special area of interest for her.  Maybe a seed has been planted..."

4/14/06 - (a soapbox tirade) "Your thoughts on the drug trade and the role it plays in MS treatment are exactly the same as mine.  I am no conspiracy theorist either, but I know money dictates so much of what happens in the world in so many different ways.  The financial incentive for the pharmaceutical industry to develop drugs to treat symptoms of a chronic disease or simply to affect t it somewhat far outweighs any incentive for pushing old, inexpensive, out-of-patent drugs.  Why should the drug companies support anything that would diminish their consumer base?  I don't have much of a problem with the fact that money makes our world function, but I do have a problem when it affects things that should be outside its realm of influence...like medical research and discerning best medical treatments.  I am convinced that the interest of the drug companies trickles down to manipulate just what is researched, how much funding is behind those projects, and how much those research projects are publicized.  And there are the marketing effects on the medical community...doctors are just as human and vulnerable to the influence of slick advertising and sales reps as the rest of us mere mortals."

Joyce~caregiver-advocate in Dallas for Steve J (SPMS).  CAP since August 06, Cpn, Mpn, B. burgdorferi, systemic candidiasis, EBV, CMV & other herpes family viral infections, elevated heavy metals, gluten+casein sensitivity. 

cypriane wrote:...doctors are just as human and vulnerable to the influence of slick advertising and sales reps as the rest of us mere mortals."

***************

Ah, but alas therein lies the rub..they often insist they are not..

**le sigh**

Wheldon Protocol for rrms since Oct '05.  Added LDN 4.5mg qhs Oct '07.  All supp's.  Positive IGG's for Lyme Disease,Babesia, & Erlichiosis Sept. 2008.  Currently:  Mepron 750mg bid and Azithromycin 250mg qd for Babesia.

>I am convinced that the interest of the drug companies trickles down to manipulate just what is >researched, how much funding is behind those projects, and how much those research projects are
> publicized
.

 

In my opinion this isn't even controversial! These are well-known facts!

The other problem I think neurologist may have when contemplating 'alternative' treatments for diseases such as MS, specially in the UK, is their career structure.   If starting on a 'revolutionary'  line of treatment they go against what they have been taught and what their superiors believe, they have a lot to loose...

Michele

Michèle (UK) GFA: Wheldon CAP 1st May 2006. Daily Doxy, Azi MWF, metro pulse.

A friend of mine once referred to it as the "Saab effect." Saab automobiles are not common in the U.S.  When he told me about it, he said, "Now, you'll see about three per hour -- because we've talked about it." This was roughly true.

The neurologist Oliver Sacks once reported that after confirming Tourette's in one patient, he began to notice many, many people that "obviously" had Tourette's (many of them on the street.) Only after he published his "popular" work on it, did other doctors begin to realize that it was actually a fairly common disease.

Along those same lines, and more personally, many doctors' perception of CFS came not from any peer-reviewed source at all, but from a well-orchestrated promotional campaign flogging Elaine Showalter's book. She was aiming "to move into the main stream of public intellectual debate" with a book on hysteria through the ages, including CFS and GWS. Oddly, she was able to get gigs on Letterman and other popular shows, where they would chat and joke comfortably about the CFS hysterics.

And, as I have posted here, there is a well-established predjudice against B-12 injections. My great aunt had pernicious anemia. When she was in her 80's, her doctor declared that "she doesn't need this (B-12) at her age." Crazy in 6 weeks, dead in six months. No data at all, just "fashion."

 Ron

 

On Stratton protocol for CFS starting 01/06 (NE Ohio, USA).

RonOn CAP for CFS starting 01/06 (NE Ohio, USA)Began rifampin trial 1/14/09Currently: on intermittent

More self-quoting from 4/14/06 (the end of the soapbox tirade):

"Here's a question for the medical community:  in this day and age, how many of what are considered standard, proven, effective treatments of all treatable illnesses actually evolved or resulted from experimental, anecdotal, counter-intuitive, desperate, or even accidental treatments?  I would venture to guess most!"

Currently recovering from previously internalized snit (snotty fit).  Calla lilies spiking up, birds singing, ink running low......Cypriane

Joyce~caregiver-advocate in Dallas for Steve J (SPMS).  CAP since August 06, Cpn, Mpn, B. burgdorferi, systemic candidiasis, EBV, CMV & other herpes family viral infections, elevated heavy metals, gluten+casein sensitivity. 

D W

Cypriane, quoting your words: "today I visited our internist to broach the cpnhelp treatment protocol to her. She cut me off so quickly and sharply I was amazed. I had expected a possibly chilly reception, but her reaction was vehement. It seems she has a cousin with MS who is broke from spending all her money on a "cure" a few years ago. She said the so-called "cure" had sounded good in theory, seemed to make alot of sense, but had failed, of course."

Thanks for your posts. When Sarah's illness became aggressive, after years of indolence where the only sign was a slight clumsiness, I didn't dare begin to hope the antibiotics would work. The disease was terrible to witness because some modalities tended to improve (giving you hope) while others tended to worsen (destroying that hope). There was a sense of flickering but steadily worsening deficit. I now know that this is because there is simultaneous demyelination and remyelination in the progressive lesions. Once the disease enters the progressive phase the natural history is towards inevitable decline. The rate at which a person falls down through the Kurtzke scale can be used to predict the time-span of the disease. You can see a graphical representation in this paper [Kremenchutzky D, Cottrell G, Rice W et al. (1999) The natural history of multiple sclerosis: a geographically based study. 7: Progressive-relapsing and relapsing-progressive multiple sclerosis: a re-evaluation. Brain 122:1941-1949] Well: what kind of prognosis was I looking at? Someone utterly helpless in six months and dead in 2 years? Yes: something of that order. Because, let's face it, MS can be a terrible disease and mainstream 'evidence-based' medicine has little to offer at any stage of the disease and nothing at all when it becomes progressive. That is why there is so much soft-focus on MS in the MS societies, who tend to dwell on the plains and forget the people who fall down the chasms. I thought 'no more clutching at straws'. I just gave the antibiotics, and watched them to destination. Relief when they worked: no other emotion. Relief like you might expect to feel when snatching a child from the path of a train. Perhaps relief is not an emotion.

When Sarah - against all prediction - improved, and her MRI scan improved also, delighting the radiologist, we had to decide our actions. We are both intelligent people with things to do. We are both very private people. Sarah could easily have accepted the fact of improvement, and she could have got on with her painting, making up for lost time. I could have got on with my medical work and my writing (I have had four metaphysical novels published; one of them won a literary prize, the final judge of which was Graham Greene. I'm not being immodest when I say they are good - I think they'll be resurrected.) But I am sure that, had we done that we should have felt guilty. So I set up the web-site, and we both devote quite a lot of time to answering questions. We knew that we were going to encounter real hostility. It came sooner than expected. The neurologist whom Sarah had seen refused to look at the MRIs showing improvement. He averted his eyes and said 'I can't see this.' What telling words. A year later a group of GPs asked me to give an after-dinner speech on MS and antibiotics. Could the same neurologist also take part and share the platform? 'Of course', I said, glad of the opportunity to present the evidence. When they asked the neurologist there was an almighty tantrum; there was talk of referring me to the General Medical Council. (And the GMC is a Star-Chamber court. If you have a complaint made against you and they decide to investigate it then your name is removed from the on-line record of registered medical practitioners.) There were two things that saved me: firstly, our decision never to let money enter the equation and, secondly, never to promise improvement.

When I was at Medical School there was an acceptance that medicine was not a uniform subject: there was room for opinion and individual experience. This freedom (that you could do what you thought was best, provided you could justify your actions) is being eroded. It is being replaced by a slavish adherence to clinical guidelines. Now, that's possibly alright for diseases whose cause, course and treatment are worked out. But in diseases which are poorly known and understood - and MS is a prime example - clinical guidelines are a sheet-anchor which keeps knowledge of the subject well and truly in the past. If, as a consultant, you gave evidenced advice aside the mainstream, you were once called (not without some admiration) a maverick; now, say anything beyond the fossil record and you are more likely to be called a charlatan.

Well, I think we did the right thing. Another thing that allows me to speak without trepidation is because I have a strong woman beside me. And yet another thing is that I retire in 3 years 8 months and can safely assume that, even if the Star Chamber do try my case I'll be gone by the time they come up with their decision. Thanks for listening to me.

 

In the public bar of the Mariner's Arms,
Bridgwater: storm outside.

Sheet-anchored in an age whose drift
began way back; (some abstraction
of it in the mind, caulking up the rift
between the sight of elements in action
- day by day an ever-sliding sea
infloods towards the foregone end -
and a dumb presentiment that we
are strangely moveless.) Depend

upon a day: unloose a light: keep
where tables of the past predict:
finely ride a sea.
The brain's asleep
before it feels. An unknown derelict,
a name storm-lost, a home-port
feigned, a flighted hour of day,
a casual act of speech, a sky's line caught
by change, denying change, the play

of sight and stance: the way I take,
the sea-moved span,
as though
suns burned to light blind ends: wake
and the last thought is the first.
Below,
and swift, the ever-moving sea,
(some metaphor, some noun untrue)
I wish to go: I wish to be.
A self, a stranger where the ways are few.

D W - [Myalgia and hypertension (typically 155/95.) Began (2003) taking doxycycline and macrolide and later adding metronidazole. No medication now. Morning BP typically 110/75]

David= Eloquently said, on all counts. 

On CAP's protocol for Cpn in CFS/FMS since December 2004.
Currently: 150mg INH, Doxy/Zith, Tini pulses 

"I really didn't say everything I said." Yogi Berra

David wrote:

[quote]When I was at Medical School there was an acceptance that medicine was not a uniform subject: there was room for opinion and individual experience. This freedom (that you could do what you thought was best, provided you could justify your actions) is being eroded. It is being replaced by a slavish adherence to clinical guidelines. Now, that's possibly alright for diseases whose cause, course and treatment are worked out. But in diseases which are poorly known and understood - and MS is a prime example - clinical guidelines are a sheet-anchor which keeps knowledge of the subject well and truly in the past.[/quote]

This process is also apparent in education, at least in the U.S., and I suspect in much of the West. Education has devolved to what used to be considered mere training. And, while slavish adherence to pre-approved curricula is possibly alright for average students, the tails of the bell curve are basically unserved. While much abuse by bad teachers has been stopped, there is also very little room for excellence. (Please, other educators, don't misunderstand me: there are excellent teachers in classrooms -- stifled, bored, under attack on many sides; but I know they are there, being crammed into mediocrity by the system I'm describing.)

The 'usually adequate' is the enemy of charlatantry and brilliance, both.

Ron

 

On Stratton protocol for CFS starting 01/06 (NE Ohio, USA).

RonOn CAP for CFS starting 01/06 (NE Ohio, USA)Began rifampin trial 1/14/09Currently: on intermittent

D W

Oppenheimer's Diagnostic Neuropathology

2nd Edition
Hardcover: 512 pages
Publisher: A Hodder Arnold Publication (New Edition April 21, 2006)
Language: English
ISBN: 0340815604

This text, written by David Oppenheimer and Margaret Isiri, has an excellent chapter on Multiple Sclerosis. It is excellent in that it is informed purely by observation, both macroscopic and microscopic, and this observation is not deformed by any hypothesis as to causation. This is rare. I've just been reading it again. The book should be obtainable through a library. David Oppenheimer has since died, but I remember his scrupulous honesty as a pathologist. He was one of those people one might term a 'medical agnostic' - he wasn't afraid to look into the large tracts of the unknown without having a theory to which to cling. This is shown in the puzzlement evident in the conclusion of the chapter on MS (2nd edn): 'There remains the question why a particular episode of demyelination occurred in a particular place on a particular date. In most instances this question will have to remain unanswered; but a convincing answer in only a few cases may give a lead to better understanding of a very mysterious disease.'

David Oppenheimer was a cellist and pianist of some ability. He was said (though I never witnessed this myself) to keep a cello in his room, which he would play while weighing up diagnostic problems.

D W - [Myalgia and hypertension (typically 155/95.) Began (2003) taking doxycycline and macrolide and later adding metronidazole. No medication now. Morning BP typically 110/75]

David,  Thank you for all of the above in more ways than the obvious ones.  I spent three years as a biology major/English literature minor in college.  When I couldn't kill the mice for an experiment in histology lab, I flip-flopped and finally graduated with a degree in English literature and a minor in biology.  The love of literature has been crowded out of my life since then by more mundane interests/demands and worsening eyesight.  My postings on this website attest to the amount of time I have been spending on investigations into finding a meaningful treatment for my husband and executing a plan of action.  Though this has been very straining on my eyes, there is no question that it has been a worthwhile sacrifice.  When my husband's treatment is under way, and we arrive at a new very abnormal "normal" in our daily lives, I'll be sacrificing my eyes to your literary works (but at a more reasonable pace)......Cypriane

P.S.:  Thanks to all other commenters as well.

Joyce~caregiver-advocate in Dallas for Steve J (SPMS).  CAP since August 06, Cpn, Mpn, B. burgdorferi, systemic candidiasis, EBV, CMV & other herpes family viral infections, elevated heavy metals, gluten+casein sensitivity. 

As in the past church or bible was the only one authority and whatever did not correspond well with it, really or seemingly, was declared as untruly or nonexisting, today it is science. Science and scientists become the only one authority, uncriticly accepted. Many of the doctors, scientists etc. think that when they acquire some proficiency in one limited field of science, they are infalliable in it and also often in others. So science becomes absolutely unscientifically inffaliable god of numerous people, who believe blindly in it like believers in variety of exterior churches..There is some dogmatism, the need to believe blindly and to recognize inffaliable authority which builds barriers to those, who are on the right track I think.

Stratton/Wheldon protocol 02/2006 - 10/11 for CFS and many problems 30 years

Maybe any authorities would like to ignite  woodpiles once more, as well as in the dark Middle Ages!

Jan, Prague, Czech Republic

On CAPs:12/01/2005 till March 2013; 20 years CFS,IBS, fibromyalgia; about 10 years chronic sinusitis, laryngotracheitis, from 2002 hoarseness; from 2003 - v.s. lumbosacral meningoradiculitis, hypertension... 

D W

Eric,

Thanks for that link. I've ordered a copy of the review from the library. The more one thinks about it, the more this highly complex pathophysiology (still nothing like understood) fits in better with a chronic, multi-staged infective process than with primary autoimmunity.

One might quote Wilfred Trotter (pioneer neurosurgeon and pioneer sociologist, 1872 - 1939): “The mind likes a strange idea as little as the body likes a strange protein and resists it with similar energy. It would not perhaps be too fanciful to say that a new idea is the most quickly acting antigen known to science. If we watch ourselves honestly we shall often find that we have begun to argue against a new idea even before it has been completely stated.�

Best wishes for the exams.

D W - [Myalgia and hypertension (typically 155/95.) Began (2003) taking doxycycline and macrolide and later adding metronidazole. No medication now. Morning BP typically 110/75]

I found a very interesting article about medical guesswork. I recommend to read it all.

Also articles from Paul W. Ewald are very interesting. It makes great sense to me along with Red qeen, wrote by Matt Ridley, which should be studied not only in specialized schools.

Prague, The Czech Republic, On Wheldon protocol for Cpn and Mycoplasma since 02/18/2006.

Stratton/Wheldon protocol 02/2006 - 10/11 for CFS and many problems 30 years

D W

I've only read the abstract, but these writers found that 100% of drug studies funded by pharmaceutical companies concluded by supporting the trial drug’s use: in studies with disinterested funding, only 67% endorsed the trial drug.

‘Thirty studies of drugs . . . were supported by pharmaceutical companies, all of which reported positive results. Of the 18 studies . . . not supported by pharmaceutical companies, 67% reported positive results. The association between pharmaceutical funding and positive findings was statistically significant (P = 0.0007).’

I’m not sure whether this merely replicates the dictum that ‘he who pays the piper calls the tune’ or whether it illustrates the subtle evidenced-based nature of human cupidity. [Finucane TE, Boult CE. Association of funding and findings of pharmaceutical research at a meeting of a medical professional society. Am J Med. 2004 Dec 1;117 (11): 842-5.]

D W - [Myalgia and hypertension (typically 155/95.) Began (2003) taking doxycycline and macrolide and later adding metronidazole. No medication now. Morning BP typically 110/75]

David, here we go again.

Maybe this time we'll remember? Nah.

Ron

On CAP for CFS starting 01/06 (NE Ohio, USA)

Currently: doxy & zith -- continous; metronidazole -- 5 days on, 7 days off.

RonOn CAP for CFS starting 01/06 (NE Ohio, USA)Began rifampin trial 1/14/09Currently: on intermittent

Ron, they are just in the process of demolishing
some old wards in the nearly disused part of the hospital nearly opposite
us.  The tall, well ventilated wards are considered very old hat and much
inferior to the newer wards south of the river, with their separate bays, beds
rather too close together and very poor ventilation. 
 
On the other hand, our house of three storeys
above ground,a full width cellar and on the top of a small hill, might be
a bit chilly on some winter days, but in summer is excellent on natural air
conditioning: with windows facing east, south and west, if we prop all the doors
open and open all the windows, no problem unless there is absolutely
no breeze blowing from anywhere, which doesn't happen
often.......Sarah
 
An Itinerary in Light and
Shadow
Wheldon regime since August 2003, for very aggressive SPMS.  Intermittent therapy after one year. 2006 still take this, now two weeks every three months.  EDSS was about 7, now 2. United Kingdom.

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

Just to keep it all together, Michele's lost post! http://www.cpnhelp.org/our_house#comment-12537 complete with flowering yuccas.......SarahAn Itinerary in Light and Shadow Wheldon regime since August 2003, for very aggressive SPMS.  Intermittent therapy after one year. 2006 still take this, now two weeks every three months.  EDSS was about 7, now 2. United Kingdom.

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

D W

In a lighter mode-

I visited one of our control of infection nurses yesterday, and I was amused by a quotation which she had put on the notice-board of her room. The words were those of Pierre Pachet, Professor of Physiology at Toulouse University. Translated, they ran thus: 'Pasteur's germ-theory is ridiculous nonsense.' He said that in 1872. History doesn't recount whether he ate his hat. 135 years later, some things have changed: others, alas, haven't. The evidence for a C. pneumoniae input into MS is compelling; I list it on this page, which I have now headed with Professor Patchet's quotation. (link) I guess that many more hats will have to be eaten. (One of my favourite pieces of cinema is where Stan Laurel starts to eat Oliver Hardy's hat in Way Out West; for the rest of the film Hardy wears his hat with bites taken out of the brim.)

Image removed.

D W - [Myalgia and hypertension (typically 155/95.) Began (2003) taking doxycycline and macrolide and later adding metronidazole. Now on intermittent treatment. BP this am 115/80.]

D W - [Myalgia and hypertension (typically 155/95.) Began (2003) taking doxycycline and macrolide and later adding metronidazole. No medication now. Morning BP typically 110/75]

David- it's a well historical fact that eating hats was an early method of  antibiotic ingestion, as the mercury used in felting hats has antimicrobial properties. Unfortunately, it also has side effects, as can be seen from Laurel's pale complexion and prominent eyebrows. 

CAP for Chlamydia pneumonia since 11/04. 25yrs CFS & FMS- Currently: 150mg INH, 300mg Rifampin, 200 Doxycycline, 500mg mwf Azithromycin, plus 500mg Tinidazole 2x/day pulses every two weeks. Whew! That's a lot!

‘Science can purify religion from error and
superstition. Religion can purify science from idolatry and false
absolutes.’  Who said this, and was he referring to Prof.
Pachet?........Sarah
 
An Itinerary in Light and
Shadow
Wheldon regime since August 2003, for very aggressive SPMS.  Intermittent therapy after one year. 2006 still take this, now two weeks every three months.  EDSS was about 7, now 2. United Kingdom.

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

Red

Great quote Sarah.    "Each can draw the other into a wider world, a world in which both can flourish".   

On Combined Antibiotic Protocol for Cpn in Rosacea since 01/06

Treatment for Rosacea

  • CAP:  01/06-07/07
  • High-Dose Vit D3, NAC:  07/07-11/08
  • Intermtnt CAP, HDose Vit D3:  11/08-01/09
  • HDose Vit D3, Mg, Zn: 01/09-
D W