Macrocytic red blood cells (rbc)

Submitted by Alexandra Gibbs on Tue, 2005-11-01 05:07
Does anyone know of a link between infections and macrocytic red blood cells?  Before my diagnosis a blood test showed that I had much larger than normal red blood cells which is known as macrocytic.  Apparently this is common in people with MS. I was just wondering if this had anything to do with the monocytes being infected with Cpn.

Alexandra I don't know if this is the same condition exactly, but I found this on the indicated link. It sugggests a B12 deficiency, which we know is common from infectious sources as B12 is a primary detox and antioxidant agent. (see section on Porphyrias in Treatment link) and in Stratton/Vanderbilt protocol.

From:http://www.answers.com/topic/anemia

Macrocytic anemia The most common cause of macrocytic anemia is megaloblastic anemia due to a deficiency of either vitamin B12 or folic acid (or both) due either to inadequate intake or insufficient absorption. Folate deficiency normally does not produce neurological symptoms, while B12 deficiency does. Pernicious anemia is an autoimmune condition where the body lacks intrinsic factor, required to absorb vitamin B12 from food. Alcoholism can cause macrocytic anemia. Drugs that inhibit DNA replication, such as methotrexate, can also cause macrocytic anemia. This is the most common etiology in nonalcoholic patients. The treatment for vitamin B12-deficient macrocytic and pernicious anemias was first devised by William Murphy who bled dogs to make them anemic and then fed them various substances to see what (if anything) would make them healthy again. He discovered that ingesting large amounts of liver seemed to cure the disease. George Minot and George Whipple then set about to chemically isolate the curative substance and ultimately were able to isolate the vitamin B12 from the liver. For this, all three shared the 1934 Nobel Prize in Medicine.

On Wheldon/Stratton protocol for Cpn in CFS/FMS since December 2004.

 

CAP for Cpn 11/04. Dx: 25+yrs CFS & FMS. Currently: 250 aithromycin mwf, doxycycline 100mg BID, restarted Tini pulses; Vit D2000 units, T4 & T3, 6mg Iodoral

The association of MS and macrocytosis is well known. It is a complex subject. Probably due to low B12 plus cpn interference with mitochondrial membrane, resulting in disorders of haem synthesis. Depletion of antioxidants due to chronic infections may aggravate this.  I couldn't find anything about infections, but I did find this in addition to Jim's posting:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=1430153&dopt=Abstract"Multiple sclerosis (MS) is occasionally associated with vitamin B12 deficiency. Recent studies have shown an increased risk of macrocytosis, low serum and/or CSF vitamin B12 levels, raised plasma homocysteine and raised unsaturated R-binder capacity in MS. The aetiology of the vitamin B12 deficiency in MS is often uncertain and a disorder of vitamin B12 binding or transport is suspected. The nature of the association of vitamin B12 deficiency and MS is unclear but is likely to be more than coincidental. There is a remarkable similarity in the epidemiology of MS and pernicious anaemia. Vitamin B12 deficiency should always be looked for in MS. The deficiency may aggravate MS or impair recovery. There is evidence that vitamin B12 is important for myelin synthesis and integrity but further basic studies are required.........."Aren't they always?Sarah



Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

oh dear, will have to keep chomping the yucky Vit B complex pills!  And maybe a little less red wine. 

 

Thanks for the info.

Started CAP April 2005, right leg motor function now worse

Concentrate more on the sublingual B12.  http://store.yahoo.com/iherb/b12advanced.html  You only need to take one a day of these and they are very small!  They are cherry flavoured.  Red wine in moderation is beneficial  as well.Image removed.
(Ooh, I'll have a look at that link you just posted!)
Sarah
Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.