Is MS contageious?

Recently my cat's back legs stopped working for no apparent reason. Could she have caught MS/CPN from me? How would one treat a cat??

Hi Willow, How are you doing.   Sorry to hear about your cat.   There are some people in this community who are treating their pets for Cpn.   Do a search for pet treatment or some such words and you should find it.

How old is your cat?   It is quite common for older cats to have minor strokes that affect some of their mobility.   Some make very good recoveries and go on to live normal lives for a number of years.   Did this happen suddenly? or did you see a gradual decline of mobility.

Michele: Wheldon CAP1st May 2006 IBS, sinusitis, alopecia, asthma, peripheral neuropathy. 26th March 2007 continuous Flagyl at 400mg with 5 day pulses at 1200mg every three weeks. Spokesperson for Ella, RRMS Cap Started 16 March 2006

Michèle (UK) GFA: Wheldon CAP 1st May 2006. Daily Doxy, Azi MWF, metro pulse.

Willow, CPn is only contagious in the acute stage: an active respiratory infection when you can cough or sneeze it over anyone.  MS is definitely not contagious: you have to have the genetic predisposition to get it.  If your cat is rather long bodied the problem might lie there.  Dachshunds often have trouble with their back legs........Sarah   An Itinerary in Light and ShadowWheldon regime since August 2003, for very aggressive SPMS.  Intermittent therapy after one year. 2007 still take this, now two weeks every three months, but still slowly improving and no exacerbation since starting. EDSS was about 7, now 2.
Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

Sarah         

I have a few thoughts about the question of whether or not MS is contagious.  Frankly, I dispute the assertion that it is not and that one must have a genetic predisposition to have it.  I admittedly have not much else to go on other than my own  experience with it and the body of knowledge I've read , self-directed, over the years about it. I also do not have access to the expertise of DW to bounce off ideas either.  Regardless, I do have a few ideas about the answer to the question about whether or not MS is contagious.

Cpn as you agree, is contagious at certain stages.  It is not the sole root of MS, but is the likely primary causal factor in a majority subset of people with MS.  That being said, I agree that it's clearly not the only factor but just one of them.  I don't believe that genetics are high on the list as a factor, I think that's just a convenient hypothesis that is more far more theoretical than concrete, along the lines of the theory of auto-immunity being the primary cause.

My thought about the question of whether MS is contagious is that a more accurate answer would be that it's "conditionally contagious".  It requires a combination of circumstances to be in place, but it is passed from person to person as a pathogen (Cpn).  MS will only develop if other factors are present, such as health conditions, low vitamin D levels, etc.  The breadth of persons with MS just seems to really be so broad that the possibility of genetics being a factor seems implausible to me.

all my best

John

RRMS/EDSS was 4.5, now 4.??? on Wheldon Protocol (nac, doxycycline, azithromycin, metronidazole) since 04/12/2006

best, John

RRMS/EDSS was 4.5, 5, 6, 6.5, 6.9999, 6.5 on Wheldon/Stratton Protocol beginning 04/12/2006
nac 4x600 mg/day
doxycycline 2x100mg/day
azithromycin 3x250mg/day MWF
metronidazole 3x400mg/day then 3x500mg/day

Willow, I am so sorry but I agree that kitty probably has another issue of some kind. It is hard to see our pet friends having issues. I hope she/he gets well! I hope you are getting well too. marie On CAP since Sept '05 for MS, RA, Asthma, sciatica. EDSS at start 5.5. Currently on: Doxy 200, Azith 3x week, Tini 2x month, all supplements. "Color out side the lines!"

On CAP since Sept '05 for MS, RA, Asthma, sciatica. EDSS at start 5.5.(early cane) Now 6 (cane full time) Originally on: Doxy 200, Azith 3x week, Tini cont. over summer '07, Revamp of protocol in Summer '08 by Stratton due to functional loss; clarithro

Hi Willow, I have been wondering how you have been doing. As to your cat....If he goes in and outside(heck, even if it's an inside cat), take her/him to the vet and have them do a lyme test. That is a major cause of paralysis in pets. My neighbors dog went "lame" and with treatment returned to normal. Now, I love animals, but HOW ARE YOU? Lexy
--------------- "Chance favors the prepared mind." --Louis Pasteur Husband treating MS with CAP

John, I disagree with you completely there. If contagion was an issue, then whole families would go down with it, schoolfriends sitting at the same desk, college students in the same accommodation and so on.  I was genetically predisposed to get MS, my sister wasn't, but she does have something else which might prove to be caused by a CPn infection.  David and I both got a reinfection at the same time, he, I think, went down with it first, he ended up with cardiovascular problems and much worse fibromyalgia than before.  My MS turned aggressively progressive.  Another cause for me was that when I first developed MS I spent long hours indoors, in art studios with little natural light, or in University libraries, the British Museum and various art galleries, so the natural vitamin D deficiency so common with MS became worse.  At this time I also was living a very stressful life, which I am not going to talk about.  So, combine the genetic predisposition and infection with CPn with these two other factors, it seems almost inevitable.  I'm sure David would agree with me, I might bounce it off him later!   Incidentally, since this doesn't address Willow's cat at all, I had one left on my doorstep as a kitten when I was at University.  It didn't become sick, but it gave me some horrible cat flea bites which swelled up enormously with my by then overactive immune system.  I can get bitten with impunity now.......Sarah   An Itinerary in Light and Shadowdiv>Wheldon regime since August 2003, for very aggressive SPMS.  Intermittent therapy after one year. 2007 still take this, now two weeks every three months, but still slowly improving and no exacerbation since starting. EDSS was about 7, now 2.
Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

Sarah

As I said, I believe it's "conditionally contagious", which is a different sort of classification than the blanket statement "it's contagious".  I think of MS as a stage of infection that may never be reached, may never occur in someone if they don't have the right systems already compromised in their bodies.  Systems such as the immune system and low vitamin D levels, which I also experienced by working inside for well over a decade and rarely getting sun exposure as well as lacking the dietary alternative.  Not everyone who picks up Cpn develops MS, there needs to be other factors in play to lead it to happening.

You wrote that "If contagion was an issue, then whole families would go down with it, schoolfriends sitting at the same desk, college students in the same accommodation and so on."  The similar postulate could be made of the unlikelyhood of genetics being the cause or a big factor in that you generally don't see a line of MS following a family tree, not being inherited.  Further, the population of MS is such a broad swath of mankind, the genetic factor would have to be common to just about everyone, which would suggest that far more people who aren't living in the Northern Hemisphere would develop it.  The epidemiology just doesn't support to postulate that MS is genetic, it even counters it.

Anyhow, I'm not trying to debate you on it really but propose an alternate definition/classification for MS as "conditionally contagious" because that really is the truth of the matter.  Cpn causes it and Cpn can be transmitted from person to person.  Whether or not you'll develop MS depends on other conditions being in place.

 

 

all my best

John

RRMS/EDSS was 4.5, now 4.??? on Wheldon Protocol (nac, doxycycline, azithromycin, metronidazole) since 04/12/2006

best, John

RRMS/EDSS was 4.5, 5, 6, 6.5, 6.9999, 6.5 on Wheldon/Stratton Protocol beginning 04/12/2006
nac 4x600 mg/day
doxycycline 2x100mg/day
azithromycin 3x250mg/day MWF
metronidazole 3x400mg/day then 3x500mg/day

Willow, I had a collie who would collapse (rear legs) whenever you ran your fingers down her spine fromher neck to hindquarters. Vet said it was a degrading of the myelin sheath somewhere in the spine, though I no longer recall the specifics. He was angry with me for not bringing it to his attention years earlier, as he said there were things he could have done for her. Hmmm, myelin sheath....

The difference between what we do and what we are capable of doing would suffice to solve most of the world’s problems.  Mohandas Gandhi

The difference between what we do and what we are capable of doing would suffice to solve most of the world’s problems. Mohandas Gandhi

D W

Well, John and Sarah, I have to award the prize to Sarah in the 'Is MS contagious?' debate.

Firstly, contagious means 'passed on by touch'; Staphylococcus aureus sepsis is often contagious; C. pneumoniae infection isn't. Let's then amend the question to 'Is MS transmissible from person to person?' The answer is still no. MS is a syndrome in which many factors have to come together before it manifests itself. C pneumoniae infection is only one of these. A person with MS will have encountered the pathogen many times; he or she is most unlikely to have got it from someone else with MS. The other factors are likely to include HHV6, EBV, HSV and endogenous retroviruses. A genetic inheritance is also necessary. Other factors such as oral tolerance may play a part. Exhaustion of antioxidants in the brain by heavy metals or solvents may also play a part. Adventitious infections with Flu A may play a part. So no, the syndrome is not transmissible; some of its causes are. Perhaps the most fascinating are the endogenous human retroviruses (HERVs), of which there are, I believe, thousands in our genome, almost all of them acquired by our ancestors before they had even become apes. They typically modify immune expression. It has been suggested that local immunosuppression caused by HERVs allowed the development of mammalian placental birth. To my mind the presence of HERVs makes a very robust case for evolution.

To think of MS being transmissible (or potentially transmissible) is to add another (and in this case unnecessary) burden to the person with the disease.

I think Willow's worry is that her cat caught an infection from her; the answer is almost certainly not.

So Sarah, claim your prize, which will be an aperitif of dry spirit and piri peppers, suitably diluted.

D W - [Myalgia and hypertension (typically 155/95.) Began (2003) taking doxycycline and macrolide and later adding metronidazole. Now on intermittent treatment. Normotensive.]

D W - [Myalgia and hypertension (typically 155/95.) Began (2003) taking doxycycline and macrolide and later adding metronidazole. No medication now. Morning BP typically 110/75]
lee

What about mycoplasma. My dog and cat(rip) were sick. Dog with lupus and cat with neuro stuff. I know that Garth Nicolson has a special section on his site about vetrinary testing. What about Chlamydia psittaci wouldn't it be in the same family as cpn as far as phases? Would it be treated the same? If the std can cause all the same problems as cpn it seems that even though they are different strains it would have to be treated the same.Or maybe a henchman infection along with cpn? http://www.provet.co.uk/health/diseases/chlamydia.htm sjogren's diagnosed 2/03, 200mg minocin daily, mwf zithromax, flagyl every 3 weeks.

200mg doxy daily, 500 zithromax mwf,flagyl 1000 m-fri.rifampin 2x daily,chloestryramine 2x daily

DW

Well, the bias of your association with Sarah aside, thank you for taking the time out to write something.  I had to read and re-read your message several times.  I was on the defensive and I finally broke through that and read your post.  I think the underlying disagreement between Sarah and I is due to a difference in our use of the word contagious. 

Using the definition of contagious as "communicable by touch" is not the definition I'm was using; however, I am ultimately suggesting that it is effectively tranmitted from one person to another, though by no means is it gauranteed to become MS.  I think I said that in my earlier post.  What triggers MS, what causes it is transmitted, otherwise, what are those of us with MS doing here?  You agree with that point when you stated in your post "So no, the syndrome is not transmissible; some of its causes are."  Really, that's a contradiction, but I understand the context.  "Some of it's causes are" is essentially what I'm saying as I believe I made the point that it takes other factors to add up to MS.

I respectfully disagree and continue my dispute of the idea of genetics playing a role in the formation of MS.  The research on this goes both ways.  Add the epidemiology to that and it looks to me like genetics doesn't play a signficant role.

all my best

John

RRMS/EDSS was 4.5, now 4.??? on Wheldon Protocol (nac, doxycycline, azithromycin, metronidazole) since 04/12/2006

best, John

RRMS/EDSS was 4.5, 5, 6, 6.5, 6.9999, 6.5 on Wheldon/Stratton Protocol beginning 04/12/2006
nac 4x600 mg/day
doxycycline 2x100mg/day
azithromycin 3x250mg/day MWF
metronidazole 3x400mg/day then 3x500mg/day

Hi Willow. As a kitty mama myself, I take care of three cats. I found some info on this problem for you. Does this cat have a blood sugar problem? Here's some info about diabetic cats and leg weakness. You will notice the author reccomends B12. http://laurieulrich.com/jasper/

I hope you can find an answer to your kitty's problem. Blood sugar problems can be common with older cats. Let's hope there is a solution out there for your fur girl.

Raven

Feeling 98% well-going for 100. Very low test for Cpn. CAP since 8-05 for Cpn/Mycoplasma P.,Lyme, Bartonella, Mold exposure,NAC,BHRT, MethyB12 FIR Sauna. 1-18-11 begin new treatment plan with naturopath

i'm ok - seeing improvement. DF's tested neg for diabetes. lyme unlikely indoors.
Aggressive SPMS, EDSS 9, on CAP since 2005. Doxy 100mg 2x/day, Azithro 250mg MWF, NAC 2400mg/day, Metro 1250mg/day 5 days on, 10 days off, charcoal 1250mg/day during Metro pulses.

Willow, regarding your inquiry about ms being passed to others: I lost my precious cat, Penelope two yrs ago to a mystery disease. She was nursing kittens and suddenly one day could not hold her head up. I immediately brought her to the vet. About three days and $1200 worth of blood tests later the vet remained clueless. He checked for every known feline disease and vitamin/mineral deficiencies which are common in nursing queens--all were within normal limits. We brought her home and she died a few months later of what I believe was a stealth infection. Since I've been dx with ms I have been very suspicious of such things, in pets and in people. I think of this: people with HIV, AIDS, and MS, among others are not allowed to donate blood. Why? Well, the reason given ms'ers is that "the cause, or causes of ms are not known". No brainer. Which only leads me to think, IMVHO, that until the etiology is clear all possibilities are viable. I do hope your kitty gets well soon! kk2

 

On Wheldon regime [Doxy, Azith, and Flagyl]  for rrms since October '05.  EDSS was 6.5, now 5.5.  United States.

Wheldon Protocol for rrms since Oct '05.  Added LDN 4.5mg qhs Oct '07.  All supp's.  Positive IGG's for Lyme Disease,Babesia, & Erlichiosis Sept. 2008.  Currently:  Mepron 750mg bid and Azithromycin 250mg qd for Babesia.

I know many people who have MS as I live in the North of the 49th parallel.  I also know, there is no genetic predisposition in the Family Tree of these individuals.

Time will only tell for sure; I have to agree with John.  I do not accept the immune system is stupid & attacks itself; there are other reasons & bacterial components are logical.  I really don't think at this time, we can entirely rule out contagions in any event.

There are many illnesses now known that pass from animals to people.  What may be discovered in the future, well.... is the future, so who knows.

Thanks for the info on pets, I have an Irish Terrier - dog.

My best wishes to everyone. 

With Christ in Faith

Ruth 

CFIDS/ME, FMS, MCS, IBS, EBV, CMV, Cpn, H1, chronic insomnia, Chronic Lyme, HME, Babesia, Natural HRT-menopause, NAC 2.4 gm,Full CAP 6-2-07, all supplements+Iodorol, Inositol-depression, ultra Chitosan, L lysine Pulse#27 04-19-10 1gm Flagyl/day-5 days<

While MS may not be contagious, Cpn as a respiratory infection certainly is. To quote the Merck Manual:

"Chlamydia is another common cause of pneumonia in people aged 5 to 35. It also affects some older people. The disease is transmitted from person to person in tiny airborne droplets spread by coughing."

There are many instances of clustered MS outbreaks. Quoting one article:

"(2) An uneven geographic distribution of MS, even within ethnically homogeneous populations, has been a noted characteristic of the disease since its first clinical descriptions by Charcot in the nineteenth century. More than 61 prevalence clusters of MS in time and space have been reported in the English language medical literature subsequent to 1966. (3) Epidemics of MS have been reported in the Faroe Islands and in Iceland. (4,5) A cluster of 22 patients with MS living in Key West has been reported, with careful case confirmation. (6) No satisfactory explanation has been forthcoming for these prevalence clusters. Several latitude and migration studies of MS suggest patterns of distribution across a north-south gradient, with a significantly higher lifetime prevalence in northern latitudes."

The Faroe Island outbreaks are particuarly well known. Quoting another article:

"The geographical distribution of the disease.

The number of MS cases increases the further one gets from the equator in either direction.

Multiple sclerosis clusters.

Four separate clusters of multiple sclerosis outbreaks occurred between 1943 and 1989 in the Faroe Islands, located between Iceland and Scandinavia. During World War II, this region was occupied by British troops. The incidence of MS increased each year for 20 years after the war, leading some researchers to think that the troops might have brought with them some disease-causing agent."

So what's special about northern climes relative to MS and Cpn? Well, essentially you have an extremely Vitamin D poor environment that is also highly conducive to the propagation of Cpn-induced community-acquired pneumonia , due to large numbers of people being confined to small, poorly ventilated spaces in order to escape brutally cold weather during winter time.

Quite frankly, these clustered outbreaks of MS in cold climates are quite compelling evidence that some sort of community-borne pathogen is at work, and to me it is mind-boggling that such key evidence is simply ignored by the herd of MS researchers who pursue bogus theories of "auto-immune" demyelination, a most mysterious auto-immune disease indeed, since no myelin antibodies have ever been found.

basil

If cats are outlawed, only outlaws will have cats.

I'm thinking that this discussion is more about the semantics than it is about the diseases.   I don't think that anyone doubts the fact that Cpn is contagious, or that other bacteria or viruses which might be co-henchmen are transmitted from person to person and maybe from animal to person.  

Many of the diseases that we suffer because of these bacteria and viruses are given names that are descriptive of the symptoms, not the causes of these diseases.   So if you focus on the meaning of these descriptive words you will understand that the symptoms are not catching/contagious... it is the causes that are.  So you cannot catch multiple scarring of the myelin sheeth (MS) but you can catch something that might cause this to happen, or you cannot catch chronic fatigue, but you may catch something that causes you to be chronically fatigued.

Where I think that genetics might have a role is in the susceptibility of certain individuals to certain of these diseases.   Why for instance does my daughter have MS and I do not, although we both have a Cpn infection... Could it be that her father is a Scott? There is some evidence to suggest that even though you have moved from your place of origin, if you or one of your parents come from communities where MS was present you are more likely to suffer from MS than the rest of the population in your new community.

In this study the researchers talk about families originating from a high risk area in Finland.   There are a number of genetic based studies using seperated twins and adopted children that demonstrate the role of genetics in MS, even if they have not yet found an explanation for it.

Then undoubtedly environmental influences such as Vit D/sun exposure have a role to play in susceptible individuals, however this cannot be the only factor since Eskimos for instance very rarely suffer from MS. 

Michele: Wheldon CAP1st May 2006 IBS, sinusitis, alopecia, asthma, peripheral neuropathy. 26th March 2007 continuous Flagyl at 400mg with 5 day pulses at 1200mg every three weeks. Spokesperson for Ella, RRMS Cap Started 16 March 2006

Michèle (UK) GFA: Wheldon CAP 1st May 2006. Daily Doxy, Azi MWF, metro pulse.

Michele, I think you're right.  We're really saying essentially the same things though we have a slightly different take on it and using different ways to describe it.  That is semantics, though the genetics part of the disagreement isn't really so much.

Also, I have to apologize that this thread has been effectively hijacked, which was never my intention.  I never commented on whether I thought that Willow gave her cat Cpn, I have no idea.  There is no way to know one way or the other who gave who Cpn.  Maybe the cat gave it to her, only God knows and he's not telling anybody, lol!

In any case, yes, I agree, mostly semantics with the proviso that I still disagree with the genetics assertion. 

all my best

John

RRMS/EDSS was 4.5, now 4.??? on Wheldon Protocol (nac, doxycycline, azithromycin, metronidazole) since 04/12/2006

best, John

RRMS/EDSS was 4.5, 5, 6, 6.5, 6.9999, 6.5 on Wheldon/Stratton Protocol beginning 04/12/2006
nac 4x600 mg/day
doxycycline 2x100mg/day
azithromycin 3x250mg/day MWF
metronidazole 3x400mg/day then 3x500mg/day

D W

Well, perhaps everyone should have a prize, as they did after the Caucus Race in the Pool of Tears at the beginning of Alice in Wonderland. No-one doubts that the prime agent (C. pneumoniae) is transmissible, but it stretches the use of terminology to say that an unusual (1:500) manifestation is transmissible. Persons with MS do not give MS to others. Surely this is what is meant by transmissibility or the lack of it. Viridans streptococci are transmissible: invariably, as everyone carries them. Viridans streptococci also cause endocarditis. No epidemiologist would ever call endocarditis transmissible, though. People with endocarditis do not give endocarditis to others. This is more than semantics: it is to do with clarity of thought.

D W - [Myalgia and hypertension (typically 155/95.) Began (2003) taking doxycycline and macrolide and later adding metronidazole. Now on intermittent treatment. Normotensive.]

D W - [Myalgia and hypertension (typically 155/95.) Began (2003) taking doxycycline and macrolide and later adding metronidazole. No medication now. Morning BP typically 110/75]

DW

I think we are in agreement, the prime agent (Cpn) is trasmissable.  Whether or not the given person develops MS from it is not a known quantity.  This has substantially been my position.  However, I take a different look at MS from an infectious standpoint. 

The prime agent is transmissable.  The chain of events that leads to MS is dependant on this transmission of Cpn.  I described this early in the discussion as "conditionally contagious" which based on the definition of contagious was the wrong use of the word.  My mistake.

Actually...rather than thinking of MS as a disease, would it be more accurate to describe it as an outcome of an infection, one that may never be reached?  That seems to make sense.  Maybe this is what you meant by calling it a syndrome?

all my best

John

RRMS/EDSS was 4.5, now 4.??? on Wheldon Protocol (nac, doxycycline, azithromycin, metronidazole) since 04/12/2006

best, John

RRMS/EDSS was 4.5, 5, 6, 6.5, 6.9999, 6.5 on Wheldon/Stratton Protocol beginning 04/12/2006
nac 4x600 mg/day
doxycycline 2x100mg/day
azithromycin 3x250mg/day MWF
metronidazole 3x400mg/day then 3x500mg/day

Well, sorry, I am not willing to share my prize: I drank it last night anyway, and ate all the chillies: big hot ones.   MS is not a contagious disease because it isn't passed on by touch.  CPn is not contagious: it is infective, though, and can be passed on just by someone coughing or sneezing in your general direction.  It is only infective in the acute phase, not when it becomes the chronic infection which can become MS in some people, many other things in other people.    By referring to a genetic predisposition, I don't mean that it is a genetic disease, either autosomal dominant, where only one parent has to carry the particular gene or recessive, where both do, but just that somewhere in the person's genome lies a particular gene which might, in the right circumstance, lead to the development of MS.  The disese clusters in the Faroe Islands were probably as a result of British soldiers in WW2 bringing with them a virulent strain of CPn, which then combined with the general lack of sunlight and vitamin D in the diet.   Now, I hope that Willow finds out soon what is wrong with her cat and is reassured that she has not given it MS.......Sarah   An Itinerary in Light and ShadowWheldon regime since August 2003, for very aggressive SPMS.  Intermittent therapy after one year. 2007 still take this, now two weeks every three months, but still slowly improving and no exacerbation since starting. EDSS was about 7, now 2.
Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

 Perhaps we can say, "The cat's out of the bag..." and leave it at that for now?

Willow- I'm sorry about your cat's difficulties. Our pets are like our children, and it hurts to see them ill. I'd be delighted to hear more of how you are doing lately, perhaps on a new blog post? Comments were getting a bit catty here anyway. 

CAP for Chlamydia pneumonia since 11/04. 25yrs CFS & FMS- Currently: 150mg INH, 200 Doxycycline, 500mg MWF Azithromycin, 1000mg Flagyl daily (Continuous protocol)

 

CAP for Cpn 11/04. Dx: 25+yrs CFS & FMS. Currently: 250 aithromycin mwf, doxycycline 100mg BID, restarted Tini pulses; Vit D2000 units, T4 & T3, 6mg Iodoral

They just like to see  you herding cats Jim

 http://www.cpnhelp.org/questioning_if_i_should_f?page=1

 

 

 For your edification:

Submitted by Jim K on Fri, 2007-02-23 09:48.

 For your edification:

Image removed.

 

Elinor ..... from England  on CAP, doxy/roxi/tini  for ME/CFS/lyme borreliosis, positive Cpn and borrelia. Started Aug05, stopped Jan06, started again Sept 06.

Elinor ..... from England  on CAP, doxy/roxi/tini  for ME/CFS/lyme borreliosis, positive Cpn and borrelia. Started Aug05, stopped Jan06, started again Sept 06.

I had MS long before Dainty Feet was born :-/ Still worried about her but I doubt that I gave her MS. Thanks, everybody.
Aggressive SPMS, EDSS 9, on CAP since 2005. Doxy 100mg 2x/day, Azithro 250mg MWF, NAC 2400mg/day, Metro 1250mg/day 5 days on, 10 days off, charcoal 1250mg/day during Metro pulses.

I'll bet she's better looking than Jim's cat, Willow.  I hope you are doing well, though.......Sarah   An Itinerary in Light and ShadowWheldon regime since August 2003, for very aggressive SPMS.  Intermittent therapy after one year. 2007 still take this, now two weeks every three months, but still slowly improving and no exacerbation since starting. EDSS was about 7, now 2.
Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

She does. I'm ok, slowly getting better.
Aggressive SPMS, EDSS 9, on CAP since 2005. Doxy 100mg 2x/day, Azithro 250mg MWF, NAC 2400mg/day, Metro 1250mg/day 5 days on, 10 days off, charcoal 1250mg/day during Metro pulses.

Oh, Willow, she does!  She is just like the cat seen here in shadow, long since dead, killed by my step-father, the witch king of Angor.  I'm glad that you are slowly getting better.  You have much to do and it must get quite frustrating sometimes, but you have a good partner and a lovely cat.......Sarah  Image removed.  An Itinerary in Light and ShadowWheldon regime since August 2003, for very aggressive SPMS.  Intermittent therapy after one year. 2007 still take this, now two weeks every three months, but still slowly improving and no exacerbation since starting. EDSS was about 7, now 2.
Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

Eskimos are quite well supplied with both Vitamin A and D because of their fatty-fish diet. Eskimos are free of many diseases that haunt the rest of us because of their healthy diet.

Regarding Eskimos and Vitamin D:

"The evidence has just exploded--not just on bones, but diabetes, infection, insulin resistance, various cancers," she adds. And it looks like we're getting too little vitamin D for all of them.

Most vitamins occur naturally in a variety of foods. Not vitamin D.

"Initially, humans didn't require vitamin D in their food supply," says researcher Bruce Hollis of the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, "because over millions of years we evolved a mechanism to produce it in our skin."

Relying on the sun's ultraviolet rays to make vitamin D worked fine when all humans lived near the equator. But "approximately 50,000 years ago, small bands of people, almost certainly darkly pigmented, migrated gradually from sub-Saharan Africa to more northern latitudes," Hollis explains.

Further from the equator, UV rays were scarce, leading to rickets, the vitamin D deficiency disease that deforms bone, including the pelvis. "Populations couldn't survive if they became ricketic because women couldn't deliver a child," says Hollis. "Both would die at birth."

Scientists suspect that the light-skinned races lost their skin pigment so they could absorb more of the sun's UV rays.

"Northern populations became depigmented fast," explains Hollis, because the mutation that led to lighter skin had a huge survival advantage.

"People of color couldn't survive in limited sun," he adds. The exception: Eskimos have endured, because they live on fatty fish, the only food that is rich in vitamin D."

basil.

If cats are outlawed, only outlaws will have cats.

If someone with CPN gives a blood donation, what is the risk to the receiver of the blood? Are they likely to end up needing the info on this sight one day?

 

CFS-2004

CFS-2005 CPN 2500mg NAC daily

Hi cfs,  We've tossed around the blood supply issue here before.  See  http://www.cpnhelp.org/almost_too_scary_to_think and use the search window for a couple of other brief discussions.

In that thread, you might notice that MacKintosh instantly picked up on a possible cure for AIDS.

Joyce~caregiver-advocate in Dallas for Steve J (SPMS) / Cpn indicated by reactions; Mpn, EBV, CMV positive; elevated heavy metals; gluten+casein sensitive / Wheldon CAP since Aug. '06 - doxycycline+azithromycin+flagyl pulses; antivirals; chelation; LDN.

Joyce~caregiver-advocate in Dallas for Steve J (SPMS).  CAP since August 06, Cpn, Mpn, B. burgdorferi, systemic candidiasis, EBV, CMV & other herpes family viral infections, elevated heavy metals, gluten+casein sensitivity.