MediTest
27 Apr 2018
Author
chalam
Title

"nerve deafness"

Body

Hello, I am new to this site, exploring because my teenage daughter has MS. However, in reading the list of illnesses and conditions that may be caused by Cpn, I noticed "nerve deafness". Would this mean hearing impairment due to a problem with the auditory nerve? My 20-yr-old son has a mild hearing impairment which we always thought was due to antibiotics he received in the hospital at age 6 months. Also, we were told (in Paris) to be careful about his taking large dosages of antibiotics as this could destroy his residual hearing. Can anyone clarify for me?thanks,Laura 

Comments

 Laura,  The antibiotics that your son had probably belonged to a family that are potentially ototoxic - gentamycin being one - in large doses.  The ones we use are not in that family and are not in high doses.   It is those of us doing this lengthy course of abx whose reactions are strong, but it is the bug, not the drugs.   Some of us have a very heavy load due to having it spread and entrench itself for years and it does not give up lightly in those cases.  Go to the Handbook (above) and read, read, read.   It is good that you have done a blog - there will be other answers along to help guide you.  You have come here, a giant step.

Rica    EDSS 6.7 at beginning - now 2.  Began CAP Sept, 2004 with Rifampin 150 mg 2xd, Doxy 100 mg 2xd, added regular pulses Jan 2005. Jan 2006 switched to Doxy, Azith,  cont. flagyl  total 34 pulses MS

3/9 Symptoms returning. Began 5 abx protocol 5/9 Rifampin 600, Amox 1000, Doxy 200, MWF Azith 250, flagyl 1000 daily. Began Sept 04 PPMS EDSS 6.7 Now good days EDSS 1 Mind, like parachute, work only when open. Charlie Chan  In for the duration.&am

Hello again, Laura.  Both Eric and Rica (Katman) are correct here, and Rica's husband is a paediatrician, but I would like to add that I became slightly hearing deficient in my left ear sometime before starting treatment.  It isn't enough to be troubling, just a slight trouble of hearing distinctly people to the left in a place with lots of background noise.  It probably is nerve damage because it as yet hasn't got any better, or maybe only slightly, but at the same time, in over three years, it hasn't got any worse.......Sarah

An Itinerary in Light and ShadowWheldon regime since August 2003, for very aggressive SPMS.  Intermittent therapy after one year. 2006 still take this, now two weeks every three months.  EDSS was about 7, now 2. United Kingdom.

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

Hi Laura, I remember how scared I was when I was looking for a possible treatment for Ella, my daughter who has MS.   When you are taking charge of other people's health, especially your children's it can be very scary.  

I endorse what Rica says about reading.   That is the only way to satisfy yourself that you are taking sensible steps with the health of your children.  

I have read on this site that ears, sinuses etc are reservoirs of Cpn, but it is probably too late to tell what happened to your son when he was a baby, unless you have access to his medical records and can confirm which antibiotics he was given and if these were responsible for his slight deafness.   As Rica and Sarah say, the antibiotics we take have not harmed our ears at all, in fact in my case there has been some relief from a slight case of tinitus which troubles me when my sinus problems flare up, possibly because of an improvement in the sinus problem.

Keep researching and good luck, we will be here to answer any questions you may have if it is within our experience or knowledge. 

Michele:  on Wheldon protocol since 1st May 2006 for a variety of long standing ailments including IBS, sinusitis, alopecia, asthma, peripheral neuropathy, also spokesperson for Ella started Wheldon CAP 16th March 2006 for RRMS

Michèle (UK) GFA: Wheldon CAP 1st May 2006. Daily Doxy, Azi MWF, metro pulse.

Thanks all for the comments on the antibiotics. I feel like I've learned a lot. Perhaps our first line of action for my son is to have DNA testing done to determine whether his auditory nerve problem is genetic or acquired.

As for "nerve deafness" and Cpn, I can't find any info except a mention of "nerve deafness" in DW's list of Cpn related problems.  I'm also not sure what "nerve deafness" means exactly, so if any of you are bilingual British English-American English or British English-French, I could use a translation or explanation.

Thanks again,

Laura 

Mother to Sophie-17yrs-diagnosed with MS in Jan 2005 currently on Copaxone, asthmatic since the age of 2.Franco-American family living in Tokyo with little medical support.

I speak both Englishand French, and I'm not sure that I can explain what that means in scientific terms, in English or in French; it sounds more like the kind of explanation a doctor might give to a patient who might not understand their latin description of the problem.   I guess it means that the deafness your son has is due to inadequate signals reaching the brain because of some nerve/brain damage rather than mechanical damage, such as a perforated eardrum or gummed up ossicles (ear bones that vibrate and transfer sound waves to the ear drum).

Michele:  on Wheldon protocol since 1st May 2006 for a variety of long standing ailments including IBS, sinusitis, alopecia, asthma, peripheral neuropathy, also spokesperson for Ella started Wheldon CAP 16th March 2006 for RRMS

Michèle (UK) GFA: Wheldon CAP 1st May 2006. Daily Doxy, Azi MWF, metro pulse.

Laura, this is what it says here: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003291.htm

"Sensorineural deafness is an irreversible type of hearing loss that occurs when cochlear sensorineural elements or the cochlear nerve is damaged in some way; it can progress to total deafness in the involved ear(s)."

So I guess my slight hearing loss isn't going to go away, but at the same time, since starting abx it hasn't got any worse, so since it is only very slightly annoying sometimes, I shan't worry about it.......Sarah

An Itinerary in Light and ShadowWheldon regime since August 2003, for very aggressive SPMS.  Intermittent therapy after one year. 2006 still take this, now two weeks every three months.  EDSS was about 7, now 2. United Kingdom.

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

 So assuming that "nerve deafness" is simply another way to say "sensorineural hearing loss", how is this a disorder "in which vasculitis due to Chl pneumoniae may be implicated"(from DW page)?

thanks, Laura

 

 

Mother to Sophie-17yrs-diagnosed with MS in Jan 2005 currently on Copaxone, asthmatic since the age of 2.
Franco-American family living in Tokyo with little medical support.

Mother to Sophie-17yrs-diagnosed with MS in Jan 2005 currently on Copaxone, asthmatic since the age of 2.Franco-American family living in Tokyo with little medical support.

I'm sure Sarah will get back with a more scientific explanation to this than I can give you, but in the meantime, as I understand it, nothing in our body can survive without the constant stream of blood bringing the essentials to them.   If very fine blood vessels are inflamed (vasculitis) then the blood is not flowing at all of in sufficient quatities to that area.   If this goes on long enough the starved tissue dies.

Michele:  on Wheldon protocol since 1st May 2006 for a variety of long standing ailments including IBS, sinusitis, alopecia, asthma, peripheral neuropathy, also spokesperson for Ella started Wheldon CAP 16th March 2006 for RRMS

Michèle (UK) GFA: Wheldon CAP 1st May 2006. Daily Doxy, Azi MWF, metro pulse.

Today's homework: nerve deafness, as opposed to conductive deafness, can occur when any part of the accoustic tract is damaged. The accoustic tract runs from the cochlea to the pons via the accoustic nerve. The most common cause being damage to the hair-cells of the cochlea; causes include viral infections, exposure to loud noises and to certain drugs like gentamicin. Nerve deafness can occur in MS, due to lesions in the pontine region. Damage to the auditory nerve itself is rare. One might expect C pneumoniae infection, with its tendency to cause vasculitis and its neurotropism, to cause damage at any point from the cochlea to the brain. Vestibular disturbance seems quite common in long-established C pneumoniae infection: one may speculate that endotoxin gets into the inner ear. Vestibular disturbance is common in persons with Behçet’s Disease, which is a possible C pneumoniae infection.

 

This is a good link: http://www.mic.ki.se/Diseases/C09.html ........Sarah

 

 

 

An Itinerary in Light and ShadowWheldon regime since August 2003, for very aggressive SPMS.  Intermittent therapy after one year. 2006 still take this, now two weeks every three months.  EDSS was about 7, now 2. United Kingdom.

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

Very interesting, thank you. Things have certainly evolved in this area in the past 20 years; i think it is time for my son to go see a specialist.

Laura 

Mother to Sophie-17yrs-diagnosed with MS in Jan 2005 currently on Copaxone, asthmatic since the age of 2.
Franco-American family living in Tokyo with little medical support.

Mother to Sophie-17yrs-diagnosed with MS in Jan 2005 currently on Copaxone, asthmatic since the age of 2.Franco-American family living in Tokyo with little medical support.