MediTest
Submitted by Jan Figtree2019 on Sat, 2019-11-16 13:57

Yesterday I finished my 10th Pulse (Friday, November 15th).  Again, this was a regular 5-day pulse of Tinidazole (500 mg/2x a day).  

It was a fairly easy pulse with some of the usual fatigue (mild, but still noticeable) as well as some of the psychological effects I have noticed in past pulses…. My mood tends to be a bit down, pessimistic.  I was very surprised on Friday (the last day of the pulse) to have a series of “mini-meltdowns”. . . common for people with autism, but I generally don’t have them as I have learned what my triggers are and how to avoid them.  

I continue with all B-vitamins, some basic minerals, and fat-soluble vitamins (A-D-E-K).  And am still taking most, if not all the other recommended supplements recommended for the CAP.

I continue to take TUDCA to protect my liver.   And I am still taking the proteolytic enzymes (Nattokinase, Serrapeptase, and Lumbrokinase).  I take these enzymes for a number of reasons: to help dissolve thickened skin (excess collage/similar to scar tissue), to fight inflammation, to decrease pain/soreness. . . reduce inflammation.   These are all experimental.

This past month I’ve been dealing with an excess of oxalates.   This is is hard to do on a Ketogenic diet, but it was not the veggies I was consuming that had high oxalates, but the dark chocolate I was eating to excess (!) 

My experiments with fermented vegetables continue, and am really enjoying my homemade kimchi.  

This has been a tough month for my family.  We had to put down our dog, Borzou. He was 17, and loved member of our pack.  I did not think I was that close to him, but I have found myself crying a bit. I hear him and see him out of the corner of my eye. 

 

Updates:

Scleroderma:  Excess collagen continues to degrade and disappear.  I notice it mostly in my hands because I see them often.  Small blood vessels are appearing in palms/fingers… and skin color is more white.  I see old callouses (weird) still appearing…. It’s as if they have been “locked” in the excess collage (like an insect in amber).  Truly this is a slow process, but I continuously remind myself that in January of this year my whole body was hardening and quite inflexible…. And now, it is much, much softer and movements flow more easily …. Definitely not as jerky (Frankenstein walking!)  

Ankylosing Spondylitis:  I have twinges of pain in lower back, deep in buttocks, and down the sciatic track…. These are fleeting, and do not impact daily living.  I have slight stiffness in ankles and wrists, but this quickly dissipates after moving around in the morning.

Psoriasis (on elbows only):   The infected/inflamed areas are still shrinking.  Every month there is a small but noticeable reduction in the thick, silvery plaques.  Nice.

Blog comments

You seem to be doing very well Jan! I do like the way you describe your decreasing inflexibility...………...Sarah

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

Hi Jan,

That sounds really good. On we go, eh? I think I have done 9 pulses as well, metronodizole. Very sorry to hear about your dog -- what a blow to you all.

Best wishes,

Lizzie

Elizabeth Anne

Hi Everybody,

I had an appointment yesterday with the eye specialist, something with my eyelid. She asked if I had had any issues? I said, well, ages ago optic neuritis (I had it 2 or 3 times, over all, I think), so she looked. Apparently, my optic nerves are in very good shape with no damage.  Proof, if it was needed, that we do heal.

Bye for now
xx

Lizzie

 

Elizabeth Anne

That's SO good to hear! (I lost 70% of the vision in my left eye with my first/only bout of optic neuritis. Vision returned totally, while on Wheldon's protocol, though I do now have the tiniest deficit in depth perception.)

The difference between what we do and what we are capable of doing would suffice to solve most of the world’s problems. Mohandas Gandhi

Dear Lizzie

absolutely wonderful news that your eyes are good and healed. And your walking down steps in your office woithout holding banisters. Quite an accomplishment. And still over a month to go to complete a year!

Neena

I am 76 years old. My daughter-in-law was diagnosed with MS and we are all very keen for her to start this new antibiotic treatment. We hope to be able to do this in the next couple of weeks by finding a doctor willing to deal with any issues like reactions that may crop up. My daughter-in-law is 43 years old.

I have been an active poilitical journalist most of my life and have felt for a long time that there must be a cure out there for MS which the medical community has largely ignored. I am very excited by the Wheldon protocol.

Dear Jan

You write some really detailed posts. So good for everyone else reading them. Good to know there is slow but steady progress. Maybe one more year and you will be through! The journey long but the surprises it brings could be wonderful.

Neena

I am 76 years old. My daughter-in-law was diagnosed with MS and we are all very keen for her to start this new antibiotic treatment. We hope to be able to do this in the next couple of weeks by finding a doctor willing to deal with any issues like reactions that may crop up. My daughter-in-law is 43 years old.

I have been an active poilitical journalist most of my life and have felt for a long time that there must be a cure out there for MS which the medical community has largely ignored. I am very excited by the Wheldon protocol.

Sonal finished her sixth five-day pulse with metro just two days ago. She found it to be very exhausting, which took a lot from her. She also said she felt like eating more during the pulse although she also felt some nausea.

No big improvemnets so far. But yes, her right hand which had started deteriorating when she started the protocol this April, seems to be getting better, with improved grip.

Neena

I am 76 years old. My daughter-in-law was diagnosed with MS and we are all very keen for her to start this new antibiotic treatment. We hope to be able to do this in the next couple of weeks by finding a doctor willing to deal with any issues like reactions that may crop up. My daughter-in-law is 43 years old.

I have been an active poilitical journalist most of my life and have felt for a long time that there must be a cure out there for MS which the medical community has largely ignored. I am very excited by the Wheldon protocol.