MediTest
Submitted by Jan Figtree2019 on Wed, 2019-09-25 13:31

I just finished my 8th Pulse a few days ago (Monday, Sept. 23rd).  I did this pulse early because I am traveling at the end of the week, and just wanted to have it done and the psychological effects of the Tinidazole out of my system.

Overall, it was a fairly easy pulse:  some mild fatigue, but not enough to send me to bed (like the crashing fatigue I’ve had in past pulses).   I do feel blue when I am taking Tinidazole…. Sometimes it’s a deep dive---feeling really down, but this pulse it was just one day of feeling kind of low.  

I continue to take the proteolytic enzymes Nattokinase and Serrapeptase, and between the 7th and 8th pulses I added Lumbrokinase.  I am hopeful these might help with fibrosis (Scleroderma).... How can I tell that they work? I can’t. I am working on the assumption that Scleroderma causes fibrosis and vasculopathy, and these enzymes might help with the breakdown of them.  

I continue with all B-vitamins… high doses of Biotin (for Partial Biotinidase Deficiency), and extra Methylfolate, Methylcobalamin (B12), and also Riboflavin (B2) during the pulses.   I try to be constantly mindful of all the damage that Cpn has caused in my body, and that I need to work very hard to re-build my body…. And while I firmly believe that our bodies are marvelously resilent, I also think they need help to rebuild….hence the constant inflow of all basic vitamins and minerals.

I continue with Lycopene (and Dark Chocolate) to help with gut bacteria …. At least I hope it does.  Lycopene does function as an anti-inflammatory among its other benefits, and I feel this is beneficial.  Of course, you can easily get lycopene from tomatoes, but since I am on a Ketogenic diet, my vegetable/fruit eating is quite limited.

Between the 7th and 8th Pulse, I introduced a senolytic (Fisetin).  Why? Well, I am 56 and I want to encourage optimal apoptosis of old cells.   I am hoping Fisetin will help with healing from Cpn. I Pulse Fisetin. When I finish a Cpn Pulse, I do 5-days of high-dose Fisetin (each dose preceded by Bioperin to help in absorption).  This is all an experiment. It’s hard to tell if anything is helping/working. My first Fisetin pulse was quite interesting, I had a great improvement of mood + a huge surge of energy on the third day.  
 

Updates:

Scleroderma:  Continued recession of excess collagen.  I am really feeling like I am in the middle of a marathon as I want the progress to be quicker.  Mentally, the protocol is beginning to wear on me. I remind myself constantly of where I was right before the start of the protocol:   the pain, the stiffness, the hardened skin… etc. I remind myself that I have come a loooong way in just 9 months. So, I slog on.  

Ankylosing Spondylitis:  No pain. Every once in a while I have a quick, effervescent pang right at the base of my spine… there and gone.   I have had some stiffness in hands and feet in the morning between the last two pulses….. Curious, but it is also effervescent.  I can row and work in the garden…. Bending is fairly easy, and I don’t feel like I need days to recuperate.

Psoriasis (only on elbows):  (my bellwether/canary-in-the-coalmine)   the plaques on my elbows continue to shrink in circumference.  Yea! I do have big, thick whitish scales that try to flake off, but if I encourage that with picking it is just a bloody mess.  Usually, I just leave them alone. I don’t do creams/gels… they have never helped. Anyway, they ARE improving and shrinking.  

 

That’s it.  We’ve had our first good rain for many months.  It really cooled things down, and all the plants are reviving.  I continue to row most days, and will start walking/hiking in the mornings very soon now.  Thanks for reading.

 

Jan

Blog comments

Hi jan

good to read from your posts that you are experiencing slow but steady improvements. Nine months down means practically half way down the protocol. Great. I am sure the next nine months will be easier! Here is to return of total good health.

neena

I am 76 years old. My daughter-in-law was diagnosed with MS and we are all very keen for her to start this new antibiotic treatment. We hope to be able to do this in the next couple of weeks by finding a doctor willing to deal with any issues like reactions that may crop up. My daughter-in-law is 43 years old.

I have been an active poilitical journalist most of my life and have felt for a long time that there must be a cure out there for MS which the medical community has largely ignored. I am very excited by the Wheldon protocol.

Just back from a brief, but needed holiday.  I am psyched to have nine months of the protocol under my belt!

I am reading and wishing everyone much good health.

Thanks for writing.

Jan

56 y.o. with possible dual diagnoses that I am working to confirm this year: Ankylosing Spondylitis and Scleroderma, and minor Psoriasis.

I just finished my 9th Pulse yesterday (Friday, October 18th).  This was a regular 5-day pulse, with some fatigue (but not crashing fatigue), and the usual assortment of psychological effects that I feel when on Tinidazole:  anxiety heightened, sometimes a feeling of “impending doom”... 

This pulse was pretty easy… but I think at this stage I know that I will be low energy during the pulses and feel the stuff mentioned above.   It is interesting to me that the energy and mood improves almost within 24-48 hours of stopping the Tinidazole.

I feel a bit road-weary knowing that I have quite a bit more time on this protocol, but this is my path to robust good health so I plod on.

I continue with high doses of B-Vitamins:  see previous posts for specifics. I continue to take Lycopene with dark (85%) chocolate for gut health.  And I will start another pulse of Fisetin in a day or so.
 

Updates:

Scleroderma:  All my excess collagen continues to break down.  I see more and more evidence of this in my hands and forearms as I see more blood vessels appear, and the general thickness of fingers + palms diminishes.   

 

This month I have pursued my questions about how the scleroderma affects my lymph system.  This is something I have long thought needed addressing. “The lymphatic vasculature plays a crucial role in regulating the inflammatory response by influencing drainage of extravasated fluid, inflammatory mediators, and leukocytes. Lymphatic vessels undergo pronounced enlargement in inflamed tissue and display increased leakiness, indicating reduced functionality. “

I think the Scleroderma has probably hardened + stiffened + thickened my lymph glands/vessels.  I think the CAP will heal all of this, but I do like to support and enhance the CAP when I can. So, have introduced several herbal tinctures and infusions to help:  1.) Cleavers and 2.) Red Root (Ceanothus americanus) are the two herbs I chose. I also continue to use my Rebounder (mini trampoline) to mechanically move my lymphatic system. 

Ankylosing Spondylitis:  Basically no pain.  Occasionally I will have a quickly passing tinge of pain.  I am having some soreness + stiffness in feet, ankles and hands in the morning, but this quickly dissipates after moving around.

Psoriasis (on elbows only):  The plaques continue to shrink and heal.   I do not put anything on them except sunblock when I am out in the garden.  

 

Extras:  I am learning how to ferment.  This month I learned how to make a really great Kimchi.  I have a little bit left from my first batch that I will have with lunch today.   Of course I like that all these fermented dishes help heal my gut. In the next few months I am going to ferment cucumbers and broccoli + cauliflower, and will try some hard-boiled eggs.  Most of the recipes are South Korean. Yum! The ferments work well with my Ketogenic diet---most of the veggies are low-carb to start, and I only use salt to brine them….. There seem to be enough natural sugars in the veggies to get the fermentations going.

 

That’s it for now.  Thanks for reading. And a Happy Halloween from the Amercian Southwest!

 

Jan

 

 

56 y.o. with possible dual diagnoses that I am working to confirm this year: Ankylosing Spondylitis and Scleroderma, and minor Psoriasis.

Dear Jan

nine pulses down soon will enter the double digit mark and possibly begin to see rapid improvements! Wonderful that you see the shrinking of collagen and psoriasis. Another year by this time your skin should be clear and wonderful. I am also hoping the new year will improve Sonal's mobility . So cheers everyone.

neena

I am 76 years old. My daughter-in-law was diagnosed with MS and we are all very keen for her to start this new antibiotic treatment. We hope to be able to do this in the next couple of weeks by finding a doctor willing to deal with any issues like reactions that may crop up. My daughter-in-law is 43 years old.

I have been an active poilitical journalist most of my life and have felt for a long time that there must be a cure out there for MS which the medical community has largely ignored. I am very excited by the Wheldon protocol.

Neena--

Thanks so much for kind thoughts.  I am picturing Sonal surrounded by family and with good energy for Diwali festival!

J

56 y.o. with possible dual diagnoses that I am working to confirm this year: Ankylosing Spondylitis and Scleroderma, and minor Psoriasis.

Sonal is now getting ready to start pulse five with flagyl. She has now recovered from extreme fatigue after a short holiday with family in Singapore. Now some energy is back.

it is also the Big Diwali festival here around the corner so she will finish her pulse well before that to be able to enjoy a glass of wine. I plan to have the entire family over fir dinner on 24 or  25 October which would be a couple of days before the Festival of Lights. Sonal,s home already very beautifully decorated!

take care. And Sarah you are off to that exotic destination Isle of Skye? Must be spectacular desolation! The natural beauty I mean. 

Take care everyone. 

Neena

I am 76 years old. My daughter-in-law was diagnosed with MS and we are all very keen for her to start this new antibiotic treatment. We hope to be able to do this in the next couple of weeks by finding a doctor willing to deal with any issues like reactions that may crop up. My daughter-in-law is 43 years old.

I have been an active poilitical journalist most of my life and have felt for a long time that there must be a cure out there for MS which the medical community has largely ignored. I am very excited by the Wheldon protocol.

Neena, if Sonal is still worn out, she might be better to wait a couple of weeks: I did this a couple of times.

She could wait at least until after Divali. 

Sarah 

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

its OK Sarah, Sonal I thought would start pulse 5 tomorrow but it seems she started yesterday, so today completed two days. Doing ok must be feeling her energy back and wanted to put it away behind her before Diwalivwhen children also get a short few dates break from school.

you must be enjoying the spectacular natural beauty of the Isle of Skye. I was reading about it  -- only some 10000 inhabitants! Splendid isolation alone with the wind the sky and the sea. Now one can guess how you became a painter! Enjoy your visit.

neena

I am 76 years old. My daughter-in-law was diagnosed with MS and we are all very keen for her to start this new antibiotic treatment. We hope to be able to do this in the next couple of weeks by finding a doctor willing to deal with any issues like reactions that may crop up. My daughter-in-law is 43 years old.

I have been an active poilitical journalist most of my life and have felt for a long time that there must be a cure out there for MS which the medical community has largely ignored. I am very excited by the Wheldon protocol.

David always says to do whatever suits you and when: that way you won't make the mistake that Vanderbilt made with their first and only metro trial, when too many people dropped out.

Sarah

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

Actually, Neena, I was one of those people who was good at everything at school and my three best subjects were chemistry, physics and art. David says I would have made a very god doctor. I guess he is right, but too late now. Best to concentrate on what I am doing here...…

Sarah

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

Sarah you and David truly wonderful people. More than excelling at something you both excel at being wonderful human beings. Using your time to heal others. Devoting time to this website responding to all of us on a daily basis. You are a source of strength. Take care a lot of people depend on you

neena

I am 76 years old. My daughter-in-law was diagnosed with MS and we are all very keen for her to start this new antibiotic treatment. We hope to be able to do this in the next couple of weeks by finding a doctor willing to deal with any issues like reactions that may crop up. My daughter-in-law is 43 years old.

I have been an active poilitical journalist most of my life and have felt for a long time that there must be a cure out there for MS which the medical community has largely ignored. I am very excited by the Wheldon protocol.

Neena, thank you for what you say. When David at first came home with a pack of doxycycline, I did not expect it to work but I took it to make him happy. Within a few days I was able to speak clearly again, within a couple of months, my powers of thought had returned. Onwards from there.

So I started posting on thisisms.com and then Jim Kepner saw me and started cpnhelp.org.  The majority of David's cpn patients have come to him this way and I could have it no other way.  How could I be content to allow both David and I to recover but nobody else?

Sarah

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

D W

Amen.

D W - [Myalgia and hypertension (typically 155/95.) Began (2003) taking doxycycline and macrolide and later adding metronidazole. No medication now. Morning BP typically 110/75]

Sarah and DW thanks for everything and not a single day when I don't think of the miraculous chance viewing of the u tube that David made with Catalyst and the daily hope that Sonal will get better and is able to walk again

neena

I am 76 years old. My daughter-in-law was diagnosed with MS and we are all very keen for her to start this new antibiotic treatment. We hope to be able to do this in the next couple of weeks by finding a doctor willing to deal with any issues like reactions that may crop up. My daughter-in-law is 43 years old.

I have been an active poilitical journalist most of my life and have felt for a long time that there must be a cure out there for MS which the medical community has largely ignored. I am very excited by the Wheldon protocol.

Hi everyone,

My computer slowness is fixed so I can now meet the Captcha requirements.

Basically, things (i.e. my walking, mainly) are continuing to get slowly better. I notice nice little things.
In the morning, walking is pretty weak, dragging my right leg, though not as bad as before by any means. A year ago I couldn't get to the end of the road -- my right leg was dead.
As the day goes on, walking gets better and better. For example, at 8am I walk quite slowly to my office, about 2/3 mile, and getting up the stairs here takes concentration. In the middle of the day I might go into the town centre (like today, Friday, for a pub lunch). My walking will be almost normal.
When it's time to go home, it's completely fine, no limping, so dragging, no swerving to the left. 
In the middle of the day in the weekends I can go for several miles, with rests. Having said that -- the track must be smooth and hard. Last weekend a walk along the Thames Path in Oxfordshire had to be abandoned. It was too slippery and narrow, even using a stick.
So! All's well.
BTW: Sarah -- which cruise liner did you do the paintings for? Was it the QM2? I met its Cruise Director and was telling her about CPn (we were dropouts of the Thames walk), and the brilliant DW and SL. She said the paintings in the QM2, are truly special. 

Tootle pip!

Lizzie xxx

Elizabeth Anne

Lizzie, where you are now: well, your arrival was much quicker than mine, and even now, after sixteen years , I still have some foot drop. Not much though, and now that I appear to have got over my mother's shock death, I am back in improving mode once more.

It was the QM2 that I did the paintings for, but I never got to see them in situ and since I have no intention of ever going on a cruise, I doubt if I ever will, unless Cunard restart cross Atlantic voyages for people who, like me, think that flying is a bad thing for the world.

I still haven't got over the change they wanted for the two arum paintings, getting rid of the stormy sky and replacing it with harmless foliage.  I suppose I can see the point, when the bed curtains are drawn back in two of the penthouses, and an angry sky is revealed after a bumpy night!

Here is one of the six:

Sarah.

 

QM2 arums - 2

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

Hi Sarah,

A beautiful painting. I’ve never been on a cruise either, no intention as well. The room looks high quality, and very tasteful. The painting adds the perfect touch. 
Regarding the foot drop, it’s still there at the end of a day, but completely minor. Others wouldn’t see it.  It’s Like it used to be. Mornings are not great, but yesterday, early, I walked for a good 15 minutes getting papers, breakfast etc, in the rain, so walking as fast as I could. The fear of falling over has gone. It I do stumble, I can right myself. 
perhaps it’s the vitamin k? 
 

Bye for now,

Lizzie xx

Elizabeth Anne

Lizzie, vitamin k you say? I have a pot somewhere but rarely take it, unless I want my blood to clot. I probably could have done with some when in hospital for a gynaecological op. A nurse would wake me up at five in the morning for an injection in my stomach to stop blood clots. I would argue that there was no need, as she could find out if she pricked my finger. Luckily I was only there for three days.

Sarah

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

Hi Sarah, re vitamin K, I read somewhere that it is now possibly being to be considered the ‘new vitamin D’ because it had such good outcomes for us MSers

I take 2 tablets each morning and night though have been meaning to reduce that by half. It’s one of those things - never know the optimal dosage  But if you’ve used it to clot blood, heck. I will reduce. 
 

cheers  

 

Elizabeth Anne

Hi Lizzie,

always good to hear from you and take in the wonderful improvements. Isnt it quite unbelievable, like a miracle? After being told repeatedly that MS CANNOT BE CURED. So very amazing to be free from the scourge.

Neena

I am 76 years old. My daughter-in-law was diagnosed with MS and we are all very keen for her to start this new antibiotic treatment. We hope to be able to do this in the next couple of weeks by finding a doctor willing to deal with any issues like reactions that may crop up. My daughter-in-law is 43 years old.

I have been an active poilitical journalist most of my life and have felt for a long time that there must be a cure out there for MS which the medical community has largely ignored. I am very excited by the Wheldon protocol.

Hi Neena, when people ask if I’ve hurt myself when they see the foot drop. I just say I’m recovering from an infection. I never used to say MS as it was a bit dramatic, but now I’m full of it! CPn, the whole thing. 
xx

Elizabeth Anne