MediTest
8 Oct 2019
Author
Sarah
Title

David in Blickpunkt: a quarterly journal for people with MS.

Body

The third quarter of this year, 2019, had an article by Dr Kathrin Gruner, a Swiss lady from Mumpf, right on the border between Switzerland and Germany, on the river Rhine.  Having developed MS herself, she contacted David and she and her husband, another physician, decided she should be treated, with some success.

She asked David if he could write an article for MSK Blickpunkt, which he did and Kathrin translated it into German.

Comments

"Multiple Sclerosis has long been known as a mysterious and perplexing disease: this has been commented on by many authors spanning well over a century, from Charcot in the mid nineteenth century to Oppenheimer in the 1980s. I had the honour and privilege of working with the neuropathologist David Oppenheimer in Oxford. He held the opinion that the disease was multifactorial. He had noted its tendency to run in families and its geographical distribution. He was of the opinion that changes in the small blood vessels of the brain preceded white matter degeneration. This had, in fact, been first noted by the pathologist, Georg Rindfleisch over 130 years ago. Rindfleisch had commented: “If one looks carefully at freshly altered parts of the white matter in the brain, one sees with the naked eye a red point or line in the middle of each individual focus, the transversely or obliquely cut lumen of a small vessel engorged with blood. . . All vessels running inside the foci, but also that traverse the immediately surrounding but still intact parenchyma are in a state of chronic inflammation.” All this points to MS not as a primary autoimmune disease but as a host response to an extrinsic factor.

If we examine the vasculitic lesions microscopically we see that the small vessels are cuffed by host cells. These are T lymphocytes, and are a key component of the innate immune system. This cuffing can occur some distance from the lesion; nearer the lesion the vessels appear angry and inflamed; eventually they become disorganised and obliterated.

So we have a vasculitic genesis, and one that implies a creeping inflammation from cell to cell in the lining of small blood vessels. We are likely looking at an ineffective host response to a covert chronic infection. We are looking at a chronic infection spanning decades.

Though MS may have a variety of causes, one major suspect has been the respiratory pathogen Chlamydophila (Chlamydia) pneumoniae, a common cause of typically mild bronchitis. This organism was grown from the CSF of patients with MS by Stratton and colleagues in 1999. The same authors detected specific gene-sequences of the pathogen in the CSF, indicating that the organism was metabolically active. Subsequent studies triangulate the importance of this key finding: in 2003 Hintzen and colleagues found an association between episodes of clinical MS relapse and new C. pneumoniae respiratory infections. Also in 2003 Ascherio and colleagues found  a statistically significant elevation of C. pneumoniae-specific serum antibody levels in patients when the disease shifts into the progressive form.

Mainstream  thought currently considers MS to be a primary autoimmune demyelinating disease. Myelin is an insulating lipoprotein wrapped around the axons of neurones; it is produced and supported by glial cells (oligodendrocytes). The sudden local loss of myelin causes the acute MS relapse. But this myelin loss may well be a secondary ‘housekeeping’ process. The very fact that retinal vasculitis is commonly associated with MS casts considerable doubt on myelinopathy being the root cause of MS; myelin, and the oligodendrocyte cells which produce it, are not found in the retina, and the earliest pathological manifestations of MS are in blood-vessels, not nerves and glial cells. Barnett and Prineas, conducting autopsies on MS patients who had died very shortly after a relapse, demonstrated that demyelination is a secondary phenomenon: the first visible event in a newly-forming fatal MS lesion is the sudden, orderly, non-inflammatory local mass death of the cells which make and support myelin.

The epidemiology of MS suggests a communicable factor acquired in adolescence. Kurtske and colleagues found that MS was unknown in the Faroe Islands until the second world war, when British forces were billeted on the islands.

Treatment of chronic C. pneumoniae infection with antibiotics is problematic. The organism lives inside host cells, and, if treated with a lone antibiotic, changes into a stressed or aberrant form which can begin active metabolism once more when the antibiotic has been discontinued. Woessner and colleagues used courses of roxithromycin alone in treating MS without success. It seems clear that multiple antibiotics should be used for a long time. A year may be necessary. I recommend oral doxycycline and roxithromycin. These two antibiotics may be expected to winnow down the numbers of intracellular pathogens. They will also force the bacteria into a stressed aberrant mode where it resorts to an anaerobic form of metabolism known as a stringent response. In this form it becomes sensitive to drugs such as metronidazole which can be added cautiously to the regimen. Caution really is necessary, as the bacteria contain endotoxins; if released too quickly these can cause distress to the patient.

MS, if caught in the relapsing-remitting or early progressive phase, can often be successfully treated using this method. N acetyl cysteine may be added orally; this compound is a good candidate for destroying the elementary body (the spore form of C. pneumoniae).

Further details, including citations, references and other material, can be found on my webpages ( http://www.davidwheldon.co.uk/ms-treatment.html )

www.cpnhelp.org is a useful forum for the discussion of chronic C. pneumoniae infections."

 

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

Oh, excellent.

The difference between what we do and what we are capable of doing would suffice to solve most of the world’s problems. Mohandas Gandhi

Such good news Sarah, DW article  on MS CPn for Kathrin. Excellent

neena

I am 76 years old. My daughter-in-law was diagnosed with MS and we are all very keen for her to start this new antibiotic treatment. We hope to be able to do this in the next couple of weeks by finding a doctor willing to deal with any issues like reactions that may crop up. My daughter-in-law is 43 years old.

I have been an active poilitical journalist most of my life and have felt for a long time that there must be a cure out there for MS which the medical community has largely ignored. I am very excited by the Wheldon protocol.

hi,

congrats. Just read about your visit to new neuro and absent of deficits! Where were you in terms I'd EDSS and now? How long did your recovery take? 

I am asking all these questions because waiting anxiously for walking improvement for my daughter in law Sonal who started the protocol exactly six months ago.

waiting to hear from you. And here's to your good health and even better health, neuro be damned!

neena

I am 76 years old. My daughter-in-law was diagnosed with MS and we are all very keen for her to start this new antibiotic treatment. We hope to be able to do this in the next couple of weeks by finding a doctor willing to deal with any issues like reactions that may crop up. My daughter-in-law is 43 years old.

I have been an active poilitical journalist most of my life and have felt for a long time that there must be a cure out there for MS which the medical community has largely ignored. I am very excited by the Wheldon protocol.

He probably won't see this for months because his catfish farm takes up too much time.

Sarah

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

Thanks Sarah for letting me know. Do you know how much he improved? I am so anxious for Sonal who cannot walk even one step. And I wonder if and when there maybe a very positive sign that protocol has started working for her. I know there cannot be clear answers .

once again thanks Sarah. A doctor friend the other day messaged from Ukraine as he wanted to give the protocol details to someone who has MS there. I sent him this site link as well as DW website. So you may hear from Ukraine.

all the best

neena

I am 76 years old. My daughter-in-law was diagnosed with MS and we are all very keen for her to start this new antibiotic treatment. We hope to be able to do this in the next couple of weeks by finding a doctor willing to deal with any issues like reactions that may crop up. My daughter-in-law is 43 years old.

I have been an active poilitical journalist most of my life and have felt for a long time that there must be a cure out there for MS which the medical community has largely ignored. I am very excited by the Wheldon protocol.

Neena, never having met him in person, I can't say, but as for Sonal, even making just one step, not repeated for another month, would be a sign of improvement; also finding that she is able to tie back her hair, which she has already done. OK, so she has lost the ability again for now, but the very fact that she did it, means that the ability is still there.

With me, walking was the last thing to start showing improvements and my walking still is not perfect, but at least I can walk unaided.  If I hadn't taken the treatment I would have just carried on deteriorating.

Sarah

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

Yes Sarah

i understand that. The very fact that she has definitely not deteriorated over last six months since start of protocol convinces me it is working for her. More importantly both she and my son are very positive about her getting better. But I am sure you can also understand my anxiety.

they went to Singapore for a holiday for five days with the children and Sonal and her wheelchair and walker. She was good there for three if the five days but came back and was so very tired with huge spasticity etc. In short not in good shape. but already coming back to her self.

neena

I am 76 years old. My daughter-in-law was diagnosed with MS and we are all very keen for her to start this new antibiotic treatment. We hope to be able to do this in the next couple of weeks by finding a doctor willing to deal with any issues like reactions that may crop up. My daughter-in-law is 43 years old.

I have been an active poilitical journalist most of my life and have felt for a long time that there must be a cure out there for MS which the medical community has largely ignored. I am very excited by the Wheldon protocol.