MediTest
12 Sep 2019
Author
tuftyone
Title

CPN on the Superdrug website

Body

I just came across this on the Superdrug website! 

And yet my gp had never heard of it

Not sure a lot of the info is correct though?

https://onlinedoctor.superdrug.com/chlamydia-pneumoniae.html

 

Comments

The info is not flat out incorrect and at least they know that Cpn exists, which is more than many doctors do. 

Imagine the uproar if they talked about long-term antibiotics though! 

Sarah

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

If what they say is true; that 50% of people will have been infected  by the time they become adults surely most people will show antibodies in serum tests?

Diagnosed RRMS 1999. No DMDs or other meds. Have done TMJ correction, Candida protocol, CCSVI venoplasty procedure.

One might think so Tufty, except that Cpn is so hard to test for, and, being an intracellular infection, once it is safely at work inside a cell, it is not swimming around in the bloodstream: my reading was only 1:64, very low, yet I responded nearly straight away.

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

Tufty, you must have had a different test than I did, so you had better ask the lab!

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

Hi Everyone, 

Things are still going very well, and I feel really good! I think I have killed off  CPn. I'm noticing more little improvements, which is wonderful. Eg, a couple of days ago I was knocked back in a queue, and righted myself without staggering. It was only a few months ago that this led me to falling in a heap...

It seems like my walking is now about 5.5/10, and I found a new trick. I walk as if I'm walking with those athletic walking sticks, really moving my arms around. This makes me put my heels down. I think on my foot-drop side I've only been walking on the ball of my foot. I don't actually have any of those sticks so I might get some. It has made such a difference. My husband said to me that I always walked with my right arm held out a bit in front of me. I know why this was - it was in case I fell or staggered and I could protect myself. 
When we walk any distance I wear my FES walking aide, but I can trot around the office no problem.

Also, a friend of mine runs an afternoon slot on a local radio station. She is so impressed with the whole Wheldon story she has asked me to go along next month and specifically talk about it. I did say, You know though, the medical community dismisses this? She knows and says she wants to help in any way to get the word out. 
So -- any advice? Any good stories to tell? Jan - you've got some cracking ones!
Sarah, do you mind if I mention you specifically? It's only a little radio station, run by the University of Northampton, and I have no idea of the listenership. 

Bye for now,
Best wishes,
Lizzie xx

 

Elizabeth Anne

D W

Lizzie,
With regard to your coming radio interview, do use any part of my website which may be helpful. The address is http://www.davidwheldon.co.uk/ms-treatment1.html I review the evidence of an infective input into MS, and have been very careful to give full scientific references from reputable journals.

The problem lies in concepts of causation. Autoimmunity has been thought to be the prime cause of MS for some sixty years. This notion has been ingrained in the medical psyche, and most doctors are unable to think beyond it. (As an example, Sarah’s neurologist, who trained in Queen’s Square, London, refused to look at the MRIs that showed great improvement and diminution of lesions. He refused to share a platform with me at the local Medical Institute, and was even quite rude to me. For him, his professional gravitas was more important than the unexpected recovery of a patient he had consigned to a nursing home. I am afraid many doctors are like this: they are used to being the final dispensers of knowledge, and the availability of information on the Internet has them worried.)

D W - [Myalgia and hypertension (typically 155/95.) Began (2003) taking doxycycline and macrolide and later adding metronidazole. No medication now. Morning BP typically 110/75]

DW, Every time I hear that term used as a 'cause' of disease, I cringe. To me, 'autoimmune' means 'we don't know the cause, so we call it autoimmune'. MS was more correctly thought to be an unidentified infection until 'autoimmune' became the catch-all buzzword. Over time, medical schools taught 'autoimmune' as if it was gospel. Now we have to work to reinstate the idea of the INFECTION. So frustrating!

The difference between what we do and what we are capable of doing would suffice to solve most of the world’s problems. Mohandas Gandhi

Hi MacKintosh

It's insane too as autoimmune system is "just" a part of our bodily engine so to speak. Like limbs, heart, blood vessels etc. We all have chinx/ weaknesses in our armours where we are more or less open to future attacks and so consequences.

And it's SO logical to think of underlying causes being an  invadading of foreign bodies so causing infections and pressures on our systems. 

And Im not even medically trained but can see the obvious.

Kiki

D W

You are absolutely right.
I have been amazed how, on treating persons with MS using antibiotics, signs of other ‘autoimmune diseases’ briefly emerge. It’s quite common to see a lupus-type facial rash which fades after a month or so.

D W - [Myalgia and hypertension (typically 155/95.) Began (2003) taking doxycycline and macrolide and later adding metronidazole. No medication now. Morning BP typically 110/75]

I once ran across a paper on Guillain-Barré syndrome which said something like "This is one of the few autoimmune diseases that has actually been proven to be autoimmune."  The disease is about what I'd imagined multiple sclerosis to be, back when pretty much all I'd heard about it was that it was an autoimmune attack on myelin: it's a uniform attack on all the nerves throughout the body, not a localized affair.  As such it puts people in hospital beds very quickly.  The immune system also realizes its mistake and backs off after a week or two, if the patient hasn't died in the meantime.  While there is commonly a lengthy rehab process, and there may be permanent damage left, there's no sign of ongoing damage after the first attack.

Lizzie, if only two people listen to the show and one of them is helped, it is worth doing.

Do try to make the point though, that the treatment helps many more people than just those with MS though.  David's heart problems would probably have killed him by now if he hadn't taken the treatment meant for me.

Sarah

 

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

Yes, allergies, rosacea, asthma, skin conditions, balance issues, all have been helped or reversed, according to our members.

The difference between what we do and what we are capable of doing would suffice to solve most of the world’s problems. Mohandas Gandhi

Yes, allergy to insect bites is much better with me and hay-fever apart from ivy,  which blossoms late, in late September and half of October! 

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

just a quick update. Sonal started her fourth pulse yesterday. So far good. I am so hoping that by the she is through sixth there should be some noticeable improvement.

Neena

I am 76 years old. My daughter-in-law was diagnosed with MS and we are all very keen for her to start this new antibiotic treatment. We hope to be able to do this in the next couple of weeks by finding a doctor willing to deal with any issues like reactions that may crop up. My daughter-in-law is 43 years old.

I have been an active poilitical journalist most of my life and have felt for a long time that there must be a cure out there for MS which the medical community has largely ignored. I am very excited by the Wheldon protocol.

hi Lizzie and Kiki

how are you doing? Moved to Spain Lizzie? Improvements continuing? And you Kiki better rested now? 

Take care

neena

I am 76 years old. My daughter-in-law was diagnosed with MS and we are all very keen for her to start this new antibiotic treatment. We hope to be able to do this in the next couple of weeks by finding a doctor willing to deal with any issues like reactions that may crop up. My daughter-in-law is 43 years old.

I have been an active poilitical journalist most of my life and have felt for a long time that there must be a cure out there for MS which the medical community has largely ignored. I am very excited by the Wheldon protocol.