MediTest
Submitted by Sarah on Sun, 2019-08-25 12:42

mother

I have not been very visible for the last few weeks.  This is because my Mother died from a massive and sudden stroke two weeks ago tomorrow: she was just short of ninety, but here she is at four, with her own Mother.

Lately she had lived near to my sister, on the Isle of Skye, which made her happier because she spent five happy years in the Highlands, whilst grand-dad was posted there during WW2, his posting being running a Polish army hospital.

My sister and I are both happy that her death was quick and painless and she died still of sound mind. 

 

Blog comments

D W

A remarkable woman, she had brought up two accomplished daughters.

D W - [Myalgia and hypertension (typically 155/95.) Began (2003) taking doxycycline and macrolide and later adding metronidazole. No medication now. Morning BP typically 110/75]

Sorry to hear Sarah

 

It's never easy losing a life..but pleased joy was part of end of life. Words never do much to ease pain (my own feeling) as it's part of our cycles to go through and understand life better. An understanding that actually don't need words I find. It is what it is really and it takes the time it does...

Big hug to you and may your mum be guided by light and peace on her journey further on🙏💖🌻

Dear dear Sarah

i am so very sorry to hear about your mother -- no matter what age, it is always a huge  loss that leaves a hole in the heart. I myself lost my mother when she was 86 and not keeping well and we all wished for her suffering to end. She then died peacefully in her sleep, which was a merciful end. But the loss is felt by me even today, nine years later.

a quick end with heart issue is good I suppose even if it means a sudden shock to family. Good to hear she spent happy years in the highlands. Must be beautiful there.

please take care of yourself.

neena

I am 76 years old. My daughter-in-law was diagnosed with MS and we are all very keen for her to start this new antibiotic treatment. We hope to be able to do this in the next couple of weeks by finding a doctor willing to deal with any issues like reactions that may crop up. My daughter-in-law is 43 years old.

I have been an active poilitical journalist most of my life and have felt for a long time that there must be a cure out there for MS which the medical community has largely ignored. I am very excited by the Wheldon protocol.

Dear Sarah,

I'm so very sorry to hear this. We know it will come with our parents at some time, but it still must be a blow.
Please accept my sincere sympathies and condolences.

With my very best wishes,
Elizabeth

 

Elizabeth Anne

I'm so sorry to hear about that.

I'm sure your mum is and always be really proud of such a kind and altruistic daughter.

A big hug

Giacomo

 

I am so very sorry for your loss.  There are no words that I can offer to take away the pain and emptiness.  It was only last year that I lost my mother.

 

May your mother rest in peace.

 

G.

“Don't believe everything you read on the internet.”

―    Abraham Lincoln

Sarah--

I'm very sorry to hear about your mother's passing.  I am glad she was still of sound mind.  Our family is struggling with my mom-in-law's battle with Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP)... and it is terrible to watch her fantastic mind slowly disintegrate.  

Many good thoughts to you,

Jan

56 y.o. with possible dual diagnoses that I am working to confirm this year: Ankylosing Spondylitis and Scleroderma, and minor Psoriasis.

Jan, your mother-in-law's predicament is truly dreadful: It must be much better to die quickly like my mother.

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

Dear Jan,

It must be hard to see your ma-in-law lose control. I know what that means. Naresh's mother lived with us after she was diagnosed with dementia and we looked after her till the end -- she died last year at age 89. Yes, when a person loses their mind, it is no longer possible to interact, have a conversation. It is very hard indeed. The only positive aspect, perhaps, is that the ill person herself is not so aware of the great suffering she is going through. My mother-in-law would not complain even of pain when we knew she would have been in pain -- after a particularly nasty fall

Take care

Neena

I am 76 years old. My daughter-in-law was diagnosed with MS and we are all very keen for her to start this new antibiotic treatment. We hope to be able to do this in the next couple of weeks by finding a doctor willing to deal with any issues like reactions that may crop up. My daughter-in-law is 43 years old.

I have been an active poilitical journalist most of my life and have felt for a long time that there must be a cure out there for MS which the medical community has largely ignored. I am very excited by the Wheldon protocol.

It is very hard to watch.   S is still very aware... we visit, take her out to eat .... and we still have good conversations, but recently she has become quite depressed as she realizes she is not going to get better. 

She also has had quite a few falls in the last few years.   She is in a wheel chair full-time.  And this was a woman who loved long hikes along the beach she lived near.

She is a wonderful woman.... she loves her son and daughter so much... She is unfailingly kind.  It's hard to describe what a really great person she is.

Thank-you for writing such a kind and loving note.  

Jan

56 y.o. with possible dual diagnoses that I am working to confirm this year: Ankylosing Spondylitis and Scleroderma, and minor Psoriasis.

MHW

Dearest Sarah,

Please accept my deepest condolences on the loss of your mother.  She must have been a remarkable lady to have brought you up just the way you are. May wonderful memories of her warm your heart today and always. Mia