MediTest
Submitted by Jan Figtree2019 on Sat, 2019-07-06 19:49

I finished my 5th Pulse yesterday (Friday, July 5th).  I did five days of Tinidazole.  I shortened this pulse because it was a holiday week, and I wanted to feel good/more energetic when entertaining.

The Tinidazole is still causing some significant fatigue... I am considering taking it late afternoon/early evening for the next pulse (like Kiki is doing).

Psychologically, the Tinidazole did not cause huge mood dips ... some mild moodiness, but nothing like what I had on the 9-day pulse.

This pulse I took it easy, but still had to take naps most afternoons and had fairly long sleeps (10 hours).  My daughter is in college, so housework is minimal... gardening is minimal  .... I work on my creative projects (sewing/printmaking/and some writing).

Since I have not been able to get up at 5 AM to walk when it's cool, I bought a small/cheap rowing machine to keep up with my exercise until the fall.... we'll see how that goes.

I continue to take all supplementary supplements, and work hard to protect my liver:  turmeric, TUDCA, taurine, milk thistle, .... In the 3-4 weeks between Pulse 4 and Pulse 5, I added another 600 mg. of N-A-C to daily regimen.  I have some reaction to N-A-C still---largely allergy type reactions... this seems to dissipate after 1 1/2 weeks.  I am going to add the final 600 mg starting next week.  I will then be at a total of 2,400 mg/day of N-A-C.

I continue to protect my gut with plain yogurt + a handful of good probiotics each night.  Bowel movements have become excellent.

Scleroderma:  My skin continues to soften all over, and the thickest areas (with the excess collagen) continue to shrink and dissipate although this is a very slow process.  But when I consider where I was in January 2019, it is really spectacular progress.... I am just impatient for it all to be OFF of my body.  Areas of "pinchable" skin are growing!  

Ankylosing Spondylitis:  No pain right now.   I have had stiffness/soreness/achiness during this last pulse, but only at night.  All of this dissipates quickly upon waking and moving around.  I did have night sweats, but they are mild and I don't know if these are a part of menopause or the Cpn.

Psoriasis:  (only ever on elbows)  These areas continue to heal:  the reddness/thick scaly skin is diminishing in thickness and circumference.

I have been taking the Activated Charcoal, but not enough... it's hard for me to find four hours (two on either side of the dose) when I am not taking antibiotics or supplements.  But, I think the AC is very effective in mopping up dead/dying bacteria/toxic debris.

 

That's it for now.

Jan

 

Blog comments

Jan, considering that you have only been a member for just over six months, you are doing amazingly well!

I used yaeyama chlorella as a mopper, partly because the timescale isn't so important. It worked fine with me.  One other thing is that I changed to taking tinidazole rather than metronidazole because I didn't get such rapid mood swings: with metro I could burst into tears within half an hour.  I also eventually changed to taking the two tablets in one go, around about the time of our evening meal, then I could sleep off any grumpiness or tearfulness.  I think you will find taking yours early evening a good thing to do.

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

I will look into the yaeyama chlorella.  And I think the evening doses of Tinidazole will work well.  I was entirely happy that this last pulse didn't pull me down as did the 9-day pulse.

Cheers.

56 y.o. with possible dual diagnoses that I am working to confirm this year: Ankylosing Spondylitis and Scleroderma, and minor Psoriasis.

Jan, if you think of trying chlorella, make sure you buy yaeyama chlorella because it is produced in a controlled environment and can be guaranteed not to contain mercury.

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

hi all

wonderful to hear Jan and Kiki have both completed fifth pulse so hopefully the most difficult part of the protocol should be over for them. Great Jan you are already noticing improvements! Wow inspiration for others. 

Sonal will possibly start her first pulse tomorrow or the day after. Keeping fingers crossed. But basically optimistic. For her next four months could be tough as with severe disability any adverse exactions from pulses could be very difficult to manage. But she will she has been oh oh so very brave.

Neena

I am 76 years old. My daughter-in-law was diagnosed with MS and we are all very keen for her to start this new antibiotic treatment. We hope to be able to do this in the next couple of weeks by finding a doctor willing to deal with any issues like reactions that may crop up. My daughter-in-law is 43 years old.

I have been an active poilitical journalist most of my life and have felt for a long time that there must be a cure out there for MS which the medical community has largely ignored. I am very excited by the Wheldon protocol.

Hi Neena!

Don't forget what Sarah told me- you can always do shorter pulses dep on how you feel or even what Im doing currently as in 1 day mini pulse per week ( only my 2nd one today of that trial as I went into doing the full 5 day pulse last week) .

Drink lots, do moppers like activated charcoal, plenty rests, eat well and relax schedule even more when pulsing! Once you plan to not do much the pulse feels easier plus any energy then feels like a super bonus. For my daily life of caring it works best to take the Tini with dinner rather so I can afford to be tired nearer the end of my caring schedule day. 

First pulses I did were done tentatively really. Always planning for when my partner was home over weekends( he works away a lot) so he could take over fully. But more and more I started just leaping with pulses knowing I could handle it myself. 

Last week ie  my 5th pulse- my partner actually went away for 3 weeks incl weekends abroad for work and I whizzed through with the pulse not even having mentioned I was doing it!!

Best of times to Sonal and just keep sight set on horizon of new life, new body, new way forward!

Kiki💖

I am wishing Sonal a very easy first pulse.   And with you in her corner I am confident she can overcome any adverse reactions quickly.  

Cheers,

Jan

56 y.o. with possible dual diagnoses that I am working to confirm this year: Ankylosing Spondylitis and Scleroderma, and minor Psoriasis.

Good luck Sonal, but don't worry if you can only manage one pill the first time: you can build up slowly!

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

Taking my first pulse tomorrow good people.

actually looking forward to it starting...

starting with Metro as suggested in the Wheldon Protocol! Let’s see how my body reacts and if need to change at all!

Let’s see if 3 day pulse happens.. no pressure as you all have suggested of course.

still need to add AC to my regimen...

cheers

Quick update on 1st day of 1st pulse with Metro: no problem as such, but also treading very carefully and not doing much! Am going to carry on and try and complete my 5 day pulse! Definitely increasing my fluid intake, anyway don’t take enough as it is! 

my timings for metro, for those who are interested:

1st pill : around 10 am with breakfast, one hour after roxy and doxy

2nd pill : 3 pm, a little while after lunch

3rd pill: 9 pm, a little while after dinner and with my evening supplements

JDid not take a probiotic  cant figure out when it might be a good time to take one with this schedule of abx.  Am thinking of taking it around 11 pm today, 2 hours after my last dose of metro. Any suggestions are most welcome. Will keep tweaking as I go along.

more later 

 

 

Hi Sarah and all

i want to know whether B12 sublingual methyl cobalamin should be reduced after first three or four months? In short should Sonal reduce this from 12000 mcg to say 5000 mcg now after nearly five months into protocol and on third pulse currently?

neena

I am 76 years old. My daughter-in-law was diagnosed with MS and we are all very keen for her to start this new antibiotic treatment. We hope to be able to do this in the next couple of weeks by finding a doctor willing to deal with any issues like reactions that may crop up. My daughter-in-law is 43 years old.

I have been an active poilitical journalist most of my life and have felt for a long time that there must be a cure out there for MS which the medical community has largely ignored. I am very excited by the Wheldon protocol.

Neena, I still take 10,000 mcg of B12 a day because people with MS tend to have low levels and it gives me energy. 

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

Thanks Sarah,

so should Sonal continue with 15000 mcg of vit B12 throughout protocol?

neena

I am 76 years old. My daughter-in-law was diagnosed with MS and we are all very keen for her to start this new antibiotic treatment. We hope to be able to do this in the next couple of weeks by finding a doctor willing to deal with any issues like reactions that may crop up. My daughter-in-law is 43 years old.

I have been an active poilitical journalist most of my life and have felt for a long time that there must be a cure out there for MS which the medical community has largely ignored. I am very excited by the Wheldon protocol.

I guess that would do her more good than harm Neena.

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

Thanks Sarah

will do as long as no danger of overdose harm

neena

I am 76 years old. My daughter-in-law was diagnosed with MS and we are all very keen for her to start this new antibiotic treatment. We hope to be able to do this in the next couple of weeks by finding a doctor willing to deal with any issues like reactions that may crop up. My daughter-in-law is 43 years old.

I have been an active poilitical journalist most of my life and have felt for a long time that there must be a cure out there for MS which the medical community has largely ignored. I am very excited by the Wheldon protocol.

Neena, it is impossible to overdose on B12, because as a water based supplement, anything not needed by the body will be flushed out!

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

Ps Sarah

How many of those little b12 pillulles you reckon per day ( each one being 6000 mcg) ? Ie Im doing the 30 a day of biotins as theyre very small too.

Kiki

Kiki, I now take two a day at either 5,000 or 6,000 mcg a day, depending on the make, of methylcobalamin per day.

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

I don't know: I forget how much the injections of non methyl stuff were, but it shouldn't do you any harm!

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

Kiki,,

I think Dr Wheldon recommended 15000 mcg a day. Just check. 6x 6000 is 36000 mcg. Sonal is taking 15000 mcg that is, 3 x 5000 mcg a day. I am talking about methyl cobalamin sublingual

Neena

I am 76 years old. My daughter-in-law was diagnosed with MS and we are all very keen for her to start this new antibiotic treatment. We hope to be able to do this in the next couple of weeks by finding a doctor willing to deal with any issues like reactions that may crop up. My daughter-in-law is 43 years old.

I have been an active poilitical journalist most of my life and have felt for a long time that there must be a cure out there for MS which the medical community has largely ignored. I am very excited by the Wheldon protocol.

Great Sarah

indeed good news from the girl who had been doing protocol for two years and has fewer lesions.!

just proves one must go at it even if it takes longer to show results. I wonder with her reduced lesions her symptoms must have also reduced in the sense she must have improved greatly.

good to know can't overdose with B 12 so Sonal who just completed third pulse yesterday -- was feeling extremely tired and not so good -- will continue with 15000 mcg a day. One pill of 5000 mcg x three times a day.

Sarah that girl,s case does that mean newly diagnosed take longer to show results because there is less to show?bpossiblybthis applies to Kiki too.

take care

neena

I am 76 years old. My daughter-in-law was diagnosed with MS and we are all very keen for her to start this new antibiotic treatment. We hope to be able to do this in the next couple of weeks by finding a doctor willing to deal with any issues like reactions that may crop up. My daughter-in-law is 43 years old.

I have been an active poilitical journalist most of my life and have felt for a long time that there must be a cure out there for MS which the medical community has largely ignored. I am very excited by the Wheldon protocol.

Neena, if I think back to my very early MS days, my relapses were mild and far apart. It would have been hard indeed to know if any treatment was working.

When I was really badly affected in 2003 however, I had things to work on: the main thing for me was that I had lost the use of my right arm. This had happened twice before, but only for a couple of weeks.  This time months went by without improvement, but after starting the protocol, I managed to improve greatly by trying a little each day.

So obviously, the worse you are the sooner it becomes obvious that you are improving.

Another thing to think about though, is how many relapses you are used to: if you suddenly go from a couple a year to just one, or even none and without any  the just gradual worsenings of progressive disease, then this is surely an improvement.

Sarah           

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

Sarah,

in Sonal's case we think it was progressive from the start. She never really had an event and then slow recovery. Instead her condition deteriorated, even if ever so little in the early days. And from the start it was her walking most affected. Lately, just before march-April when we found this Wheldon protocol, her right hand had also become affected -- not being able to tie her hair, her handwriting becoming worse, and she sometimes dropped things from her hand.

I feel her hand has already improved even if slightly. Just today I told her she must write a few sentences in a diary every day only then she will be able to compre her earlier handwriting with current writing. Hopefully she will start that.

But her walking with a walker even at home is fairly restricted With some better days, some worse. She always feel worse when there is some anxiety, it could be children's exams, people coming over for a meal or anything really. She also has more energy, I think.

Neena

I am 76 years old. My daughter-in-law was diagnosed with MS and we are all very keen for her to start this new antibiotic treatment. We hope to be able to do this in the next couple of weeks by finding a doctor willing to deal with any issues like reactions that may crop up. My daughter-in-law is 43 years old.

I have been an active poilitical journalist most of my life and have felt for a long time that there must be a cure out there for MS which the medical community has largely ignored. I am very excited by the Wheldon protocol.