MediTest
6 Aug 2019
Author
scott63
Title

Arsenic in Antibiotics!

Body

This article published today in the Czech Republic:

In Poland, large-scale counterfeit medicines, arsenic and gypsum are put into them

https://www.novinky.cz/zahranicni/512034-v-polsku-se-ve-velkem-padelaji-leky-dava-se-do-nich-arzen-i-sadra.html

Cont'd

Comments

"Poland has become a center of drug counterfeiting in Europe. Up to four out of five medicines sold in Poland via the Internet and without prescriptions are to be falsified, counterfeits often reach pharmacies."

“More than 80 percent of medicines sold in  Poland over the internet and without a prescription are false. Unfortunately, counterfeit medicines are already found in official pharmacy networks and thousands of people buy them every day in the belief that they are genuine, albeit significantly cheaper than the real ones, ”said Fijalek, TVN24, who is also involved in the detection of fake medicines in Poland market."

"According to medical statistics, one in seven patients is hospitalized in Polish hospitals for counterfeit medicines that have caused not only acute stomach pain, but also subsequent damage to the liver or other important organs with lasting consequences."

Scott, you only published this a few hours ago. Most people will have not even seen it yet.  I saw it about half an hour ago but am still too busy to reply.

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

Now I have some time to answer:

Firstly, how many of these 'fake medicines' are antibiotics?  The ingredients of abx and especially out of patent ones are so inexpensive that it might cost more to make fake ones.  The actual fake medicines are far more likely to be cancer meds or heart meds and so on.

Secondly, the vast majority of people here who have MS would not be able to get abx from their GP, so they would be doomed to early death once their MS turned progressive.  Perhaps you think this doesn't matter?  

 

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

D W

I think a rumour mill is grinding away, inventing spurious rumours. Marsh's test for arsenic was established in the 1830's.

D W - [Myalgia and hypertension (typically 155/95.) Began (2003) taking doxycycline and macrolide and later adding metronidazole. No medication now. Morning BP typically 110/75]

I'm not sure what the veiled comment about 'eerily quiet' is really about, but the implication that people here are terrified, or perhaps part of some evil intent, isn't appreciated.

Those who have obtained their abx from India seem universally happy with them, some having gone to the trouble to have them tested before using.

The difference between what we do and what we are capable of doing would suffice to solve most of the world’s problems. Mohandas Gandhi

 

I am new on this site, but I would like to make a personal wish if it's ok.  I really like getting information about various sides of an issue. A big issue is antibiotics here--how to get them and how to use them. I hope that people can be encouraged to speak openly and honestly about their opinions  and positive or negative experiences with regard to them or other treatments or dosages for cpn or MS.  Thanks to you and Sarah for all you are doing.

I think I have a severe case of cpn,in the brain which I got about 8 months ago (Oct. 2018).  

I have a lot of issues with depression, balance, eyesight, ear and teeth problems.  Most important, I have brain shrinkage, and some strange symptoms of that. Does anyone share these issues?

I realize you ARE new to the forum, else you'd already be aware how tolerant this page is (and the old version of the site, as well) . We've only ever banished two members, because each, with their Twilight Zone theories and behaviors, had become so polarizing our founding members were close to withdrawing from participation.

However, while tolerating some snark and some skewed thinking, the admins here also have the same rights as anyone else, which is to comment as they see fit. My saying I don't appreciate the innuendo that there was something nefarious in the 'site going eerily silent' was exactly that. My opinion.

The difference between what we do and what we are capable of doing would suffice to solve most of the world’s problems. Mohandas Gandhi

Hi Jean, I can give Mac a helping hand here.  Please correct me if I am wrong, but it sounds like you are interested in hearing a balanced view: for example, the risks (i.e., potential side effects) of antibiotics as well as the rewards (i.e., eradication of Cpn).  The CAP therapy is very well-designed and effective antibiotic treatment for Cpn that was developed by Dr. Stratton and Dr. Wheldon.  If there is interest in the risks of antibiotics, it is best to do your own due diligence.  For example, I did a quick Google search and found these publications in less than 5 minutes:

Cognitive impairment by antibiotic-induced gut dysbiosis: Analysis of gut microbiota-brain communication.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26923630

Association between the use of antibiotics and new diagnoses of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21912437

Depletion of Butyrate-Producing Clostridia from the Gut Microbiota Drives an Aerobic Luminal Expansion of Salmonella.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27078066

Effect of antibiotics on gut microbiota, glucose metabolism and body weight regulation: a review of the literature.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26818734

It is no skin off my nose.  Each individual has the right to choose or not to choose to order medicines from an online pharmacy.  In fact, I ordered from one in late June but the Customs authorities in my country blocked it.

As for "evil intent", it is not that at all.  I would characterize it as "gross negligence" on the part of EU authorities/politicians.  The Czech article suggests that this has been going on for quite some time.  Surely, the EU authorities have full knowledge of this and have taken no action (as far as I can tell).  Poland is a member state and there are no border controls between member states which enables the sale of these counterfeits anywhere within the EU.  The production and sale of counterfeit medicines (some of which contain arsenic) is a very serious criminal offense.  Gross negligence? Absolutely!!!

"Arsinothricin is the first and only known natural arsenic-containing antibiotic, and we have great hopes for it." says a researcher from Florida International University's Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine are part of an international team that has discovered a new broad-spectrum antibiotic that contains arsenic

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/04/190416132139.htm

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

This is a new broad spectrum antibiotic being developed by an International team in Florida International University.

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

The article (or, well, its Google translation) talks a lot about gypsum being in the drugs, but mentions arsenic only briefly and as a possibility.  Which makes sense, since poisoning customers draws unwanted attention, while gypsum is harmless.  Then the headline writer put "arsenic" in the title as clickbait.

Hi Everyone, 

I stayed with some friends last night, who I hadn't seen this year, ie since I started the Protocol. Two of them, separately, commented "Hey!  Your eye is better!" It turns out that my right eyelid drooped lower than the left. I'd never noticed, though I had seen a couple of photos I didn't like, where I looked half asleep. I never saw it in the mirror either. Amazing. I don't know how long it was like that. 
Another benefit! Thanks Sarah, Dr Wheldon etc.

xx Lizzie

 

Elizabeth Anne

Hi Lizzie

of course wonderful development. I asked earlier -- perhaps you didnt see the post -- when and how much Biotin did you take? when did you start? Sonal was earlier taking about 15 mg now she has increased to 50 mg. i.e 10 tablets of 5 mg each.

have you moved to Spain? What part of Spain?

Neena

I am 76 years old. My daughter-in-law was diagnosed with MS and we are all very keen for her to start this new antibiotic treatment. We hope to be able to do this in the next couple of weeks by finding a doctor willing to deal with any issues like reactions that may crop up. My daughter-in-law is 43 years old.

I have been an active poilitical journalist most of my life and have felt for a long time that there must be a cure out there for MS which the medical community has largely ignored. I am very excited by the Wheldon protocol.

Hi Neena,

Sorry, I did miss your message. I take 10 tablets of 10000 micrograms each morning, and another 10 each evening. I found some very cheap on ebay. 
I have no further good news. In fact, walking this last weekend was pretty weak... Not as bad as it was but it was a slight reverse. Sigh...

When I spoke to Mum during the weekend I told her about the fixed droopy eye. Her reaction to this showed me that she's been aware of it for a long time too, unlike me.  People were being nice to me for ages; not mentioning it. That's quite sweet.  Anyway.

We haven't moved to Spain yet. We're hoping September / October. The place is near Malaga - not ritzy, but nice. You should come and stay. You'd be really welcome. 

Cheers, Lizzie

 

Elizabeth Anne

No issue Lizzie

sonal has started taking higher dose of Biotin at 50 mg a day and will soon increase to 100 mg and then perhaps higher. For how long have you had this higher dose biotin? Any adverse effects in terms of nausea tolerance stomach issues and so on?

its so wonderful you invited me to Spain even before you landed there! So tempting to take it up! But not before Sonal starts getting better.

your walk will improve as Sarah said earlier the improvements don't go in a straight line but up and down with the trend being upwards. So be patient as you are.

i do so very much wish for Kiki to start getting better.she needs some good luck.

take care

neena

 

I am 76 years old. My daughter-in-law was diagnosed with MS and we are all very keen for her to start this new antibiotic treatment. We hope to be able to do this in the next couple of weeks by finding a doctor willing to deal with any issues like reactions that may crop up. My daughter-in-law is 43 years old.

I have been an active poilitical journalist most of my life and have felt for a long time that there must be a cure out there for MS which the medical community has largely ignored. I am very excited by the Wheldon protocol.

Hi Nina, 
Me too, with hopes for Kiki. You are so right about the ups and downs of the signs of improvement. Some days I feel - relatively - strong and balanced. Others, limping and unsteady. However, overall the mental improvements have only got better. And, my blood pressure has decreased as well as cholesterol levels.

Bye for now xx

Lizzie 

Elizabeth Anne

Hi Scott,

Just a note to say thanks for the information you've been providing.

BTW, did you get a chance to read the article about lycopene? It looks good to me. Also, do you know if or how lycopene works in the brain?

Any thoughts about this from others? I'd really appreciate it.

Thanks so much for your comment about the article, Sarah.

 

I think I have a severe case of cpn,in the brain which I got about 8 months ago (Oct. 2018).  

I have a lot of issues with depression, balance, eyesight, ear and teeth problems.  Most important, I have brain shrinkage, and some strange symptoms of that. Does anyone share these issues?

Hi Jean,

Lycopene is potentially very interesting.  I have not had the time to research this in the past couple of weeks, but I have time today.

Patients in the publication that you cited were given 7 mg per day for 28 days.  They showed a stable increase of lycopene level in serum and a corresponding reduction of antichlamydial IgG in the serum.  The dose-dependency in Figure 7 is encouraging.  From Day 0 to Day 14, serum lycopene doubles and serum IgG is halved.  From Day 14 to Day 28, serum lycopene doubles again (approximate) and serum IgG is halved again (approximate).  I am interpreting the line between these different colored boxes as either the "average" value or the "median" value.  I may be wrong on that interpretation, but these are approximate values.

There are some other significant items to consider.  Lycopene is more complicated than you might think.  I will post them later after I have completed my research.

Thanks, Scott. I would like to know if it crosses the blood-brain barrier.  

It seems that the study used two different formulations of lycopene.  

I think I have a severe case of cpn,in the brain which I got about 8 months ago (Oct. 2018).  

I have a lot of issues with depression, balance, eyesight, ear and teeth problems.  Most important, I have brain shrinkage, and some strange symptoms of that. Does anyone share these issues?

Lycopene is very complicated because it is not a single chemical entity.  Nearly all of the lycopene in raw red tomatoes exists in the all-trans(E) form.  In processed tomatoes, some isomerization occurs to form cis(Z) isomers (here is a picture of the E isomer and some of the Z isomers:

https://www.researchgate.net/figure/Chemical-structures-of-lycopene-isomers_fig1_318246915

The Z-form has higher bioavailability, presumably due to poor absorption by the E-form.  For example, people that eat tangerine tomatoes (95% of lycopene exists in the Z-form) absorb 8 times more lycopene.  This isomerization from E to Z forms also occurs in the body via metabolic processes.  In addition to the formation of these Z isomers, there are metabolites formed by oxidative metabolism which are also known to have biological activity.

Lycopene is extremely lipophilic.  Thus, for the portion that is not excreted in the urine (after extensive "first-pass" oxidative metabolism by the liver), accumulation in lipid compartments is to be expected with chronic dosing.  That would account for the fact that lycopene or its isomers are detected in the skin after 42 days!

There was a pharmacokinetic (PK) study in dogs (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12949366).  These were some of the salient results after 28 days of dosing: "Lycopene concentrations were highest in liver, adrenals, spleen, lymph nodes and intestinal tissues", and "Although 70% trans-lycopene was used in the dosing material, most of the lycopene identified in plasma and tissues was cis-lycopene."

A more comprehensive PK study was conducted in humans using 14C-lycopene (i.e., radioactive label): https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/93/6/1263/4597750

In this study, PK analysis was conducted for both 14C-labeled lycopene and unlabeled lycopene.  These were the salient results:

"The time to maximum concentration (tmax) of total 14C-lycopene in plasma was 6 h, and the elimination half-life (t1/2) was 5 d, which were different from the tmax and t1/2of unlabeled lycopene (0.5 and 48 d, respectively). 14C-Lycopene was extensively isomerized after dosing as a 92% all-trans isomer at dosing but changed to 50% trans, 38% 5 cis, 1% 9 cis, and 11% other cis isomers after 24 h."

"Lycopene was extensively isomerized after dosing and rapidly metabolized into polar metabolites excreted into urine with the rapid peak of 14CO2 after dosing, which implies that β-oxidation was involved in the lycopene metabolism. Lycopene or its metabolites were detected in skin for up to 42 d."

Proposed Mechanism:  I believe that the activity opposite Cpn is real.  However, because lycopene is transformed into so many different chemical entities, it argues for a "non-specific" mechanism of action.  Furthermore, the same mechanism is likely for "some" components of Buhner's herbs.  Specifically, one of the herbs (Biden's pilosa) is known to contain many highly lipophilic compounds.  A full-text PDF can be downloaded here:

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/299532123_Chemistry_and_pharmacology_of_Bidens_pilosa_an_overview

In particular, the polyacetylenic compounds of Figure 1 bear remarkable similarity in both gross structure and lipophilicity.  There is also a diverse array of terpenes (Figure 4) which are highly lipophilic. (I joke that Biden's pilosa has more terpenes than a can of terpentine!)

Thus, the mechanism of action could very well be the disruption of lipid trafficking (e.g. cholesterol) inside the cell, similar to that observed for "lipophilic amines" that act as functional inhibitors of sphingomyelinase:  http://cpnhelp.org/node/14132

In conclusion, I would not expect lycopene to eradicate Cpn, but it certainly could slow down replication.

In those Lycopene studies on Cpn only the patented form from Lycotec worked. I had not succeeded in getting the Lycotec Lycopene somewhere in the world, and I did not receive any reply to an email I had send to the leading study author and Lycotec itself.

See here figure 7 (b) for the dropping in IgG: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5602621/

Importantly, the positive study was done by - at least in part - employes of Lycotec, so one have to be very careful about the results. Especially the finding that you get a fourfould drop of IgG in 4 weeks under Lycotec-Lycopene is highly unplausible in my eyes, because the natural half-life of IgG is said to be 2-3 weeks. So production of new IgG by the immunsystem must have stopped immediately and completely with the first Lycopene dosing. I find this highly unlikely.

But because Lycopene is not so expensive and it would certainly do no harm, I tried it with a not-Lycotec Lycopene and measured IgG before and 8 weeks in therapy. No difference in IgG levels was detectable. It would be interesting to this little experiment with Lycotec-Lycopene, but as I said, I found no possibility to get it anywhere in the world. The carocelle-shop, which seems to distribute it, told me that it is out of stock and they don't know when they get new stuff. This has been the case for a year or so now.

Maybe someone else would also send an inquiry to Lycotec directly and ask them if there is a possibility to get their patented Lycopene form anywhere?

Thanks for the info Markus!  I saw that the publication indicated using "proprietary" lycopene.  My guess was that they had used the 5-cis-isomer since that is the most metabolically stable isomer in pharmacokinetic studies.  I can only imagine what Lycotec was charging for pure 5-cis-isomer!

I thought that immunoglobulin half-lives were concentration dependent.  Do you think it possible that the half-life is much less in this study with IgG starting at 400 ng/mL, which is a very high level?

I am not certain that one needs to dose with the pure 5-cis-isomer.  All of the E-isomer is converted to cis-isomers in vivo with the 5-cis as the predominant species.  This assumes that I am correct in guessing that their proprietary lycopene is indeed the 5-cis isomer.  I could be wrong of course.

This study tested two different forms against each other. Maybe there is more information about the chemical differences of the different Lycopene forms: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6145244/

I guess bioavailability is an issue (although I didn't read the study). Often supplements get absorbed only to a very little extent and are therefore fairly useless. If Lycotec found a way to improve the absorption of their Lycopene, this could make the difference. But it's speculative, as I didn't read the paper.

Thanks again Markus!  I did not realize that there was another publication.  So, in the 2017 publication, the authors call it "proprietary GA lycopene" and in the 2018 publication "lycosome‐formulated GA lycopene".

In the 2018 publication, the authors cite that the bioavailability is poor.  It is well known that the cis-isomers found in tangerine tomatoes give an 8-fold higher amount in plasma than red tomatoes.

So, if absorption is the problem, then one can increase the dose.  I would expect plasma levels to increase with chronic dosing since the half-life is quite long.  I assume that they are referring to bioavailability after a single acute dose.

Thanks, Scott and Markus.

It appears that Ivan Petyaev is both the CEO of Lycotec and one of the authors of the studies about lycopene. 

Was it ever possible to buy the formulation of lycopene used in the 2017 and 2018 studies?

I think I have a severe case of cpn,in the brain which I got about 8 months ago (Oct. 2018).  

I have a lot of issues with depression, balance, eyesight, ear and teeth problems.  Most important, I have brain shrinkage, and some strange symptoms of that. Does anyone share these issues?

My formulation for lycopene is olive oil.  I will crush 8 x 10 mg tablets and suspend/dissolve in 1 - 2 spoonfuls of olive oil.  If I get 10% absorption, then the effective daily dose is about 8 mg.  If I get more than 10% absorption, it is even better.  I will let my liver do the work of isomerization to the cis-isomers.

I found Carocelle lycopene on Amazon.  It seems there is one available. I copied the list of ingredients from the back of the box:

 

 

I think I have a severe case of cpn,in the brain which I got about 8 months ago (Oct. 2018).  

I have a lot of issues with depression, balance, eyesight, ear and teeth problems.  Most important, I have brain shrinkage, and some strange symptoms of that. Does anyone share these issues?