MediTest
24 May 2019
Author
MacKintosh
Title

Back on the Protocol

Body

A quick update.

When I did the full protocol, I did it for years. Considering it gave me back my life, I didn't care if I had to do them for the rest of my life. (After all, the neurologist told me I'd have to shoot myself up with MS drugs every day, forever.)

Comments

A quick update.

When I did the full protocol, I did it for years. Considering it gave me back my life, I didn't care if I had to do them for the rest of my life. (After all, the neurologist told me I'd have to shoot myself up with MS drugs every day, forever.)

Fourteen years later, I worried. It seemed my memory for phone numbers was slipping, my words got tangled up when I was overtired, I bounced off a few doorframes when racing from this chore to that. It was time to do a refresher course of a few months of abx and my insanely wonderful doctor (who has done the protocol, too) agreed. I started back, full out, a month ago.

I started metronidazole almost immediately after starting doxycycline and azithromycin. I don't advise this for anyone newly starting the protocol, but I've 'been there and done that' before and I knew what to expect and what to watch out for. I learned, last time, that I get very weepy and negative after the third day on metronidazole and I warned my guy and a couple of good friends that they needed to understand that and also to tell me if I was getting too maudlin or weepy.

I made it about fourteen days before I decided to stop the metronidazole for awhile. After dinner with a friend this past week, I found myself unable to slow my mind down on a number of issues we'd talked about and I was terribly negative and depressed, so I figured I'd hit my limit for this 'pulse' and needed to get the flagyl out of my system and concentrate on pushing the toxic remains of whatever cpn I'd killed out of my body, too. I'm now drinking lots of water and loading up a bit on antioxidants, to flush the garbage out of me. By the time Thomas and I leave for our two day trip tomorrow, I'll be back in good humor.

Now, for the upside. My short-term memory is improving. My spatial judgment has improved, my mental and physical laziness have declined and I feel inclined to self-start projects and chores again. I hadn't realized how lax I'd gotten about myself and upkeep on my home and my personal projects until now. It's dramatic enough that I would say others might have thought I warranted the tag of 'clinical depression'. But that fog is lifting now.

So, for those of you who are just starting... yes, this may be your lifelong battle, but at least you know what you're battling and you have those of us who've gone through it already to help you along.

And, for those of you who have 'done' and are 'done with' the protocol, please stay vigilant and don't be embarrassed to restart the protocol for awhile. If little deficiencies creep up on you, or little hurdles present themselves again, get back on treatment and kill off the burgeoning bacteria early on. Owning your own life is worth it.

The difference between what we do and what we are capable of doing would suffice to solve most of the world’s problems. Mohandas Gandhi

What we NEED to do to avoid reinfection is continue taking N Acetyl cysteine for the rest of our lives.

I ran out and forgot to refill my supply. Then, I let it go too long and caught a vicious lung infection about 26months ago.

I'm certain that was the re-infection, because I'd even said out loud 'something is trying to invade my lungs' after about six weeks of being sick, recovering, being sick again, etc. I slid downhill imperceptibly, but steadily, since then.

The difference between what we do and what we are capable of doing would suffice to solve most of the world’s problems. Mohandas Gandhi

When I started the CAP I was in a "what have I got to lose?" mindset because my MS was advancing quickly and there was nothing effective on offer.  Twenty-two (22) pulses - and several Emergency Room visits - across two years stopped progression and gave me my life back.  The CAP truly is a marathon where the prize goes to the tortoise.   

CAP for M.S. 8/2007 - 3/2009.  Twentieth pulse metronidazole + INH completed 3/12/2009.  Intermittent treatment thereafter until 11/20/2009.  

Mac, I totally agree with you here and I am glad that you are feeling the benefit of your metronidazole!

I thought a few weeks ago that I might be joining you, but no, there are things that people can forget about having gone through the biggest cure of their life. In my case it is the tail end of the menopause and loading up on the best treatment I could find, I am starting to feel better already.

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.