MediTest
D W
Submitted by D W on Fri, 2019-01-04 20:22

My old laboratory was demolished a few years ago. It was a fine laboratory, which was instrumental in solving outbreaks, notably the outbreak of Echo 11 virus, which killed new-borns. We solved the outbreak by giving immunoglobulin and oral polio vaccine (which has immune parallels with Echo 11) and had only one death. (Other major teaching hospitals did not do this, and their outbreaks ran on, with many deaths.) Alas, I mourn my old laboratory.

Last night the rest of the hospital was burned down, in a suspected arson attack. Fortunately the buildings were disused, but they were listed eighteenth and nineteenth century buildings. I just wonder at the nature of humanity.

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Certainly arson to my mind, but East London Heath Authority should have made the place more secure!

As for the Echo 11 outbreak, I never heard anything about it: I was living up north at the time, but with so many new-borne dying all over the country, it should have reached the national press.  Margaret Thatcher and Kenneth Clarke probably have something to do with it.

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

Gosh ...
That is awful news. Awful that someone can engage in something as reckless as arson and so sad that a historical building has been destroyed so pointlessly. I do hope you have some pictures to show.

Perhaps not everybody is interested in stories that you might recount about microbiological outbreaks, mysteries and puzzles that you have solved yourself or others that you know of have overcome. I certainly am interested in hearing those stories and how you did it.
☺️
G

“Don't believe everything you read on the internet.”

―    Abraham Lincoln

D W

Thanks for your comment on the Echo 11 outbreak. It was quite severe. We gave all the newborns immunoglobin and polio vaccine; this worked by giving a herd immunity.

As for the hospital, there's a BBC article about it. I suspect it will have to be demolished - which is probably what the authorities secretly wanted: they left it derelict and unsecured as though to invite firesetting. It was a fine building erected in 1795-6.

D W - [Myalgia and hypertension (typically 155/95.) Began (2003) taking doxycycline and macrolide and later adding metronidazole. No medication now. Morning BP typically 110/75]

Bedford workhouuse

Above is the building in the old North Wing of the hospital now reduced to a ruin in Thursday's fire.  It was built in 1792 as a flannel factory but latterly became a workhouse until such places were closed after the second World war.

Used as mainly office space by the hospital after that, when the main part of the hospital moved to south of the river, it gradualy became unused.  

Below is a picture of the same building after the fire.  Boarding up a few windows is not enough to keep people out!

Image result for bedford workhouse

 

 

 

 

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

D W

Alas, alas, alas.

D W - [Myalgia and hypertension (typically 155/95.) Began (2003) taking doxycycline and macrolide and later adding metronidazole. No medication now. Morning BP typically 110/75]

However, all the walls are still standing: they are built with the same bricks used in our house, handmade and strong. The owners should be made to restore the building and turn it into apartments if they have no use for it themselves and have spent too much money building that awful thing attached to it which I can see from my studio.  I guess that is built as badly as your new laboratory in south wing.

workhouse before fire

 

Here is the downstairs corridor showing how much it had been left to rack and ruin since the eighties, when you used to give seminars in one of the rooms leading off:

workhouse corridor

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.