What is the difference between chlamydia pneumoniae and chlamydia trachomatis.

What is the difference between chlamydia pneumonia and chlamydia trachomatis ... apart from the mode of entry into the body?

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G.

Do you want the non-official version? :p

Chlamidias are a family of bacterias. Imgine bacterias are fish, and chlamidias are sharks. 

Inside the shark family... you find lots of different sharks, which share similar characteristics. 

Now imagine a whale shark and a white shark... same same but different. ;)

 

I wonder also how all these microorganisms interact... 

Any Dr. in the room?  :p

 

 

Gisel·la

(ONGOING PROTOCOL: 1 year and 2 months following Stratton/Wheldon Protocol)

MS Diagnosed: 21.IX.2016

 

D W

I think Gisel-la has it right. There are at least eleven different known species of Chlamydia in the genus Chlamydia. They all have a slightly different genome. They infect a wide range of animals; one, C. pecorum, causes really severe and debilitating infections in koala bears. They are a nasty family of obligatory parasites, and, as is common in obligatory parasites, they have a reduced genome. (The same goes for Mycobacterium leprae, the organism which causes leprosy.)

D W - [Myalgia and hypertension (typically 155/95.) Began (2003) taking doxycycline and macrolide and later adding metronidazole. No medication now. Morning BP typically 110/75]

Yes I am sure there are lots of different creatures that can be vulnerable to infection by different chlamydial types. I think that there are only two types affecting humans: chlamydia pneumoniae and chlamydia trachomatis.

 

I know that the one that this site is just concerned with chlamydia pneumonia. Pneumonia because its habitat of choice is initially our lungs. We know that CPn can go on to colonise any parts of the body. We can learn from these pages that the treatment for CPn can involve taking hundreds of antibiotic capsules over a period of several years. Initial point of entry: probably the mouth.

 

Chlamydia trachomatis is known as a sexually transmitted disease. Point of entry can also be the mouth (though usually genitally). NHS Treatment recommends 4 azithromycin tablets talken at one time.

 

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/chlamydia/treatment/

 

Why such a vast difference?

 

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G.

Sorry folks, I can't get the link to work on this page. You'll have to Google it.

 

 

“Don't believe everything you read on the internet.”

―    Abraham Lincoln

Thank you for posting that link Gisel.la and trying to help answer my question. However, after reading the paper that you posted, I confess that I am none the wiser as to why chlamydia pneumonia appears to take so much longer to treat than chlamydia trachomatis. G.

“Don't believe everything you read on the internet.”

―    Abraham Lincoln

I'll tell you what Glenn, nobody really knows, and I got this from the horse's mouth. Any doctor worth their salt should be willing to say "I don't know" sometimes, rather than coming out with a load of piffle.

Trachoma, the main cause of blindness in the world, can be cured with just one dose of doxycycline or azithromycin and a lesson in good sanitation to stop a reinfection.
Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

XDDDDDDD I totaly agree... sometimes 'I don't know' would solve so many problems. ;)

Gisel·la

(ONGOING PROTOCOL: 1 year and 2 months following Stratton/Wheldon Protocol)

MS Diagnosed: 21.IX.2016