MediTest
Submitted by mrhodes40 on Sat, 2006-06-03 16:40

Borrelia and Hydroxychloroquine Not strictly CPn but these cystic bacteria were killed effectively by hydroxychloroquine. Since research into cystic forms is so limited this is included

Repeated respiratory Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections in mice: effects of host genetic background This paper demonstrates who it is possible a ubiquitous pathogen might cause different diseases in different hosts

Ketoconazole and fluconazole reduce resistance of H pylori to flagyl Self explanatory important paper.

Induction of immunity in experimental CPn infection This dissertation holds a good overview of hte lifecycle of CPn as well as offering the possibility of vaccination against this pathogen

Cell death and inflammation during infection with the obligate intracellular pathogen, Chlamydia

Epithelial cells infected with Chlamydophila pneumoniae (Chlamydia pneumoniae) are resistant to apoptosis

Closing on Chlamydia and it's intracellular bag of tricksThis is about chlamydia and it's lifecycle intracellular: how it subverts the host systems and avoids detection

Chlamydia pneumoniae Alters Mildly Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein-Induced Cell Death in Human Endothelial Cells, Leading to Necrosis Rather Than ApoptosisThis could also be included in the cardiovascular section as it relates to atherosclerosis, yet it has implications beyond.

Chlamydia pneumoniae infection in circulating human monocytes is refractory to antibiotic treatment Proof of persistenct in spite of "adequate" therapy

Interesting Curriculum Vitae page with research articles This researcher is working on vaccine for CPn and mycoplasma. The extensive research links alone make this page valuable. Long and sort of technical with lots of CD4 and t-cell discussion. Photos of intracellular pathogens.

Family Practice article on persistence of CT in women This article is about CT and how peristence has been shown to be key to recurrent infection with CT.

Persistence in Chlamydiaceae Technical but readable essay on the current understanding and research related to perisistence of CPn. The concept of persistence is not well understood nor is it generally accepted...YET!

Cpn directly interferes with HIF 1a in host cells Cpn changes the genes of the host cell to suit its needs.

Tryptophan depletion as a mechanism of gamma interferon mediated chlamydia persistence Quote:"Analyses of infected cells cultured in medium with incremental levels of exogenous tryptophan indicated that persistent growth was induced by reducing the amount of this essential amino acid. These studies confirmed that nutrient deprivation by IDO-mediated tryptophan catabolism was the mechanism by which IFN-gamma mediates persistent growth of C. trachomatis."

Role of tryptophan supplementation in chlamydia This paper is interesting in contrast to the paper above. This author postulates in Medical Hypotheses that giving tryptophan along with antibiotics may force cryptic bodies back into metabolizing states and thus vulnerable to antibiotics.

Silencing or Permanent activation of CPnInteresting article on these peculiar forms of existence in the body explaining the invisible and chronic nature of CPn.

PersistenceThis article relates peristence to atherosclerosis and describes the lack of response by the immune system to the bacterial presence in the cells.

Comments

This will keep me busy for the next two weeks.   Thanks for the information.Michele: Wheldon CAP1st May 2006 IBS, sinusitis, alopecia, asthma, peripheral neuropathy. 26th March 2007 continuous Flagyl at 400mg with 5 day pulses at 1200mg every three weeks. Spokesperson for Ella, RRMS Cap Started 16 March 2006

Michèle (UK) GFA: Wheldon CAP 1st May 2006. Daily Doxy, Azi MWF, metro pulse.

Marie, You have been very, very busy - and productive! Thanks for this. I really do think vaccination will be the way to go in the future and hundreds of thousands of people will be spared the ravages of so many cpn-related diseases.

The difference between what we do and what we are capable of doing would suffice to solve most of the world’s problems.  Mohandas Gandhi

The difference between what we do and what we are capable of doing would suffice to solve most of the world’s problems. Mohandas Gandhi

Med Hypotheses. 2005;65(2):243-52. High risk of schizophrenia and other mental disorders associated with chlamydial infections: hypothesis to combine drug treatment and adoptive immunotherapy. Fellerhoff B, Laumbacher B, Wank R. Institute of Immunology, Ludwig Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Goethestrasse 31, D-80336 Muenchen, Germany. Many microbial factors have been implicated as pathogenic factors in mental disorders. Occurrence of such microbial factors also in the mentally unaffected population raised skepticism against such findings, although each microbial factor may cause mental problems only in some individuals, depending on the individual's immunogenetic disposition. Skepticism against the role of infection in schizophrenia was also fostered by the low impact of antiinfections treatment on the course of disease progression in schizophrenia. We discovered previously that neurotrophins like neurotrophin3 (NT-3) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), involved in processes of neuroplasticity, are also secreted by immune cells, but only by subpopulations of immune cells. Therefore, infection of the immune cell subpopulation, specialized in secreting BDNF, or of another subpopulation, specialized in secreting NT-3, could distort communication of immune cells with the central nervous system (CNS). Chlamydiaceae could cause disbalancement of immune cell sub-populations and, in some individuals with a vulnerable disposition, symptoms of mental illness. Based on previous observations of persisting IgA titers in some patients with mental illness we hypothesize that the intracellular parasites Chlamydiaceae are main pathogenic factors in schizophrenia. We hypothesize furthermore that antiinfectious treatment has to be accompanied by adoptive immunotherapy because antibiotics alone will not restore the balance of immune subpopulations. Our hypothesis is supported by examination of patients with schizophrenia and other mental disorders. Using nested PCR we found a significant prevalence of the intracellular parasites Chlamydophila psittaci, C. pneumoniae and Chlamydia trachomatis (9/18, 50%), as compared to controls (8/115, 6.97%) (chi(2)=25.86, Fisher's exact p two-tailed=5x10(-5)). Treatment with in vitro-activated immune cells together with antibiotic modalities showed sustained mental improvements in patients that did not depend on treatment with antipsychotic drugs. Future controlled studies including sham treatment of patients have to be carried out to prove our hypotheses. Publication Types: Clinical Trial PMID: 15922095 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Nelly (France-neuroLyme and ????)

 Wow, Nelly. This is an amazing piece of research. What is "adoptive immunotherapy?" Makes me wonder if there is a treatment we are missing here. Now, does this study prove we all actually are all crazy here, as the orthodox medical community insists, or the reverse? Maybe both? CAP for Cpn 11/04. Dx: 25yrs CFS & FMS. Protocol: 200mg Doxy, 500mg MWF Azith, Tini 1000mg/day pulses; Vit D1000 units, Cytotec 100mg, Plaquenil 100mg, Magnascent Iodine 12 drps/day, T4 & T3

Mol Psychiatry. 2007 Mar;12(3):264-72. Epub 2006 Nov 14.Related Articles, Links Associations between Chlamydophila infections, schizophrenia and risk of HLA-A10. Fellerhoff B, Laumbacher B, Mueller N, Gu S, Wank R. Institute of Immunology, Ludwig-Maximilans University of Munich, Munich, Germany. barbara.fellerhoff@med.uni-muenchen.de Several microbes have been suspected as pathogenetic factors in schizophrenia. We have previously observed increased frequencies of chlamydial infections and of human lymphocyte antigen (HLA)-A10 in independent studies of schizophrenia. Our aim here was to analyze frequencies of three types of Chlamydiaceae in schizophrenic patients (n=72), random controls (n=225) and hospital-patient controls (n=36), together with HLA-A genotypes. Patients were diagnosed with schizophrenia according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV. Blood samples were collected at the beginning of hospitalization and analyzed with Chlamydiaceae species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Control panels consisted of randomly selected volunteers and hospitalized, non-schizophrenic patients. We found chlamydial infection in 40.3% of the schizophrenic patients compared to 6.7% in the controls. The association of schizophrenia with Chlamydiaceae infections was highly significant (P=1.39 x 10(-10), odds ratio (OR)=9.43), especially with Chlamydophila psittaci (P=2.81 x 10(-7), OR=24.39). Schizophrenic carriers of the HLA-A10 genotype were clearly most often infected with Chlamydophila, especially C. psittaci (P=8.03 x 10(-5), OR=50.00). Chlamydophila infections represent the highest risk factor yet found to be associated with schizophrenia. This risk is even further enhanced in carriers of the HLA-A10 genotype. Publication Types: Comparative Study Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't PMID: 17102800 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Nelly (France-neuroLyme and ????)

There's a good article by Ledgerwood, Ewald, and Cochran arguing that infections are likely the cause of schizophrenia; they single out Toxoplasma gondii, transmitted by cats, as the main candidate pathogen, and argue in particular that prenatal infection is likely responsible. But they certainly don't rule out other potential infections or co-infections, and indeed make a point of saying that they expect the disease to have multiple infectious causes (in the same way that pneumonia can be caused by a variety of different germs).

Oh yeah, blame the cats for making people crazy. CAP for M.S. since 8/2007. Currently: 100 mg Dox. (2 x day), 250 mg Zith (3 x week). Second pulse metronidazole 12/2007.

CAP for M.S. 8/2007 - 3/2009.  Twentieth pulse metronidazole + INH completed 3/12/2009.  Intermittent treatment thereafter until 11/20/2009.  

 So, Norman, your answer to my question, "Now, does this study prove we all actually are all crazy here, as the orthodox medical community insists, or the reverse? Maybe both?"? CAP for Cpn 11/04. Dx: 25yrs CFS & FMS. Protocol: 200mg Doxy, 500mg MWF Azith, Tini 1000mg/day pulses; Vit D1000 units, Cytotec 100mg, Plaquenil 100mg, Magnascent Iodine 12 drps/day, T4 & T3

Well, CPn exposure is nearly universal and we're actively treating ours, so I would have to say that suggests it would be the orthodox people who are crazy. CAP for M.S. since 8/2007. Currently: 100 mg Dox. (2 x day), 250 mg Zith (3 x week). Second pulse metronidazole 12/2007.

CAP for M.S. 8/2007 - 3/2009.  Twentieth pulse metronidazole + INH completed 3/12/2009.  Intermittent treatment thereafter until 11/20/2009.  

The article I linked to isn't open-access, but here's one that is. A quote from it:

Torrey first postulated that toxoplasmosis might cause schizophrenia in the 1970s, when he read several articles attributing an outbreak of multiple sclerosis in the Faeroe Islands to the introduction of dogs there during World War II. Could indoor pets like cats, which had become widely popular only in the nineteenth century, also be reservoirs of infectious agents? Torrey, who had recently completed a book manuscript arguing that in the late nineteenth century schizophrenia and bipolar disorder went from being rare diseases to relatively common ones, became convinced that cats were central to that story. "The cat craze began with the cat shows in the late nineteenth century," he explains. "And when I went back and looked at what we know about cats as pets, it corresponded almost perfectly to what we know about the rise of psychosis."

Of course, that dog theory isn't much good, so maybe the cat theory will fail, too.

In any case, I thought the rest of the world was mad long before I ever heard of Cpn.

Intriguing finds, Nelly! I wonder if Chlamydia leaves the door unlocked, and then anyone can wander in.  Given those results, then this is even wierder -- Why People With Schizophrenia Have Lower Rates Of Cancer: New Clues Or is that getting too far away from the topic? RonOn CAP for CFS starting 01/06 (NE Ohio, USA) Currently: doxy & zith -- continuous; metronidazole -- 5 days on, 7 days off.Get the research results you paid for: support Open Access

RonOn CAP for CFS starting 01/06 (NE Ohio, USA)Began rifampin trial 1/14/09Currently: on intermittent