A New Twist on Bugs in MS

I picked this up on an MS website---thank goodness it was read there with the same suspicious eye I know you will use. I'm putting this on the back porch where it belongs. Too bizarre to summarize, just read it: http://www.southcoasttoday.com/daily/01-07/01-16-07/02fiveminute.htm "Parasitic infection is found to benefit MS patients By Shankar Vedantam, The Washington Post Patients with multiple sclerosis who also happen to have an intestinal parasite appear to have significantly fewer relapses and better outcomes than other MS patients, a new study found. The finding suggests that when the body's immune system is occupied with an external threat, it might be less likely to misfire, which happens in conditions known as autoimmune disorders. Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disorder that attacks the myelin sheath that protects nerve fibers. The study tracked 12 multiple sclerosis patients who were found to have an intestinal parasite and compared them with 12 other patients. Over four years, there were stark differences. There were three relapses among the patients who had the intestinal infection and 56 relapses in the other group. Patients with the parasitic infection also had minimal changes in disability scores compared with the other group, according to a study in this month's Annals of Neurology by Jorge Correale and Mauricio Farez of the Raul Carrea Institute for Neurological Research in Buenos Aires. The study suggests that one reason for the apparent increase in autoimmune disorders in recent years could be the decline of infectious diseases in certain countries. Because parasites often cause long-lasting infections, the researchers hypothesized that such infections could make persistent demands on the body and thereby reduce the likelihood that the immune system will attack healthy tissue. Date of Publication: January 15, 2007 on Page" Too bad the article didn't go on to report what happens to these MSers guts after the prolonged inflammation.

Several problems I see with this, 

  • it bases its conclusions on the premise that MS is caused by autoimmunity.
  •  MS is such an individual  disease that a sample of 12 is not big enough.
  • it could be that the patients with the intestinal worms had a metabolic propensity to harbour these, and that this metabolic make up also meant they were less likely to suffer as many relapses as other MS patients.
  • and of course there could be a beneficial effect from harbouring these organisms, we all have good and bad parasites living inside us...

This is a lay-person's view of things of course, and I expect there are lots of other reasons why this may have happened.

Interesting information though.... 

Michele: on Wheldon protocol since 1st May 2006 for a variety of long standing ailments including IBS, sinusitis, alopecia, asthma, peripheral neuropathy, also spokesperson for Ella started Wheldon CAP 16th March 2006 for RRMS

Michèle (UK) GFA: Wheldon CAP 1st May 2006. Daily Doxy, Azi MWF, metro pulse.

D W

Here's a link to an unusual case-report in which oral tolerance is central. http://www.medscimonit.com/pub/vol_9/no_5/3029.pdf What the report doesn't speculate upon is a possible final outcome: the immune system was apparently tamed, but the underlying infection silently continued.

D W - [Myalgia and hypertension (typically 155/95.) Began (2003) taking doxycycline and macrolide and later adding metronidazole. I

D W - [Myalgia and hypertension (typically 155/95.) Began (2003) taking doxycycline and macrolide and later adding metronidazole. No medication now. Morning BP typically 110/75]

Imagine you were found to have, lets say, an ascariosis. Your doctor would not treat you for four years just to check if you get less MS exacerbations. Not many people will co-operate. If it really works it would be because of the mobilization of the immune system to fight back infection/infestation, more or less, same way we benefit from low dose Naltrexone. What do you think? Barbara. RRMS changing to SPMS. Diagnosis Nov, 2002. The Wheldon protocol since Feb, 2005, intermittently since April 2006. EDSS 6 in 2002, zero after 3 months on Lipitor.

Cured of multiple sclerosis, stopped the Wheldon's protocol in Nov,2008. Use only LDN.

Here's something from Nature:

"Mechanisms of Disease: the hygiene hypothesis revisited" http://tinyurl.com/2qslel The authors of this Review consider how a reduced prevalence of organisms that have been part of human microecology for millennia (including saprophytic mycobacteria, bifidobacteria, lactobacilli, and helminths) and cause little, if any, harm to the host, might explain the increased prevalence of immune-mediated disorders in westernized countries.

I think I've heard that in several places before, but it all seems to be concerned with the same thing. We are by and large, so much more hygienic and "healthy" than in the old days, that the so called auto-immune diseases run riot, so give us all a dose of worms and we'll all be fine. Well, I'd sooner fight the root cause.............Sarah

An Itinerary in Light and Shadow. Wheldon regime since August 2003, for very aggressive SPMS.  Intermittent therapy after one year. 2006 still take this, now two weeks every three months.  EDSS was about 7, now 2. United Kingdom.

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

I have 3 dogs. I stupidly deworm them and my entire family every year... Barbara.       RRMS changing to SPMS in Nov, 2002 when started Lipitor. The Wheldon protocol since Feb, 2005, intermittently since April 2006. EDSS 6 in 2002, zero after the first 3 months on Lipitor.

Cured of multiple sclerosis, stopped the Wheldon's protocol in Nov,2008. Use only LDN.

Even so, I remember well something one of my high school history teachers said. She was a well-to-do widow who taught for the love of it, not the financial need, and her social circle was affluent. When one of her friends died after a mysterious decline in health, she told us about it and mentioned the autopsy results. The deceased friend, a gardener by hobby, was found to be full of intestinal worms. Apparently, while ill, many examinations and tests had been performed, but her doctors never suspected that someone of her means might be riddled with an affliction as lowly as intestinal parasitic infestation.

Joyce~caregiver-advocate in Dallas for Steve J (SPMS) / Cpn indicated by reactions; Mpn, EBV, CMV positive; elevated heavy metals; gluten+casein sensitive / Wheldon CAP since Aug. '06 - doxycycline+azithromycin+flagyl pulses; antivirals; chelation; LDN.

Joyce~caregiver-advocate in Dallas for Steve J (SPMS).  CAP since August 06, Cpn, Mpn, B. burgdorferi, systemic candidiasis, EBV, CMV & other herpes family viral infections, elevated heavy metals, gluten+casein sensitivity. 

Worms got her even before her death. It was not supposed to happen. She was a safe harbour for them. What a pity!  Barbara.       RRMS changing to SPMS in Nov, 2002 when started Lipitor. The Wheldon protocol since Feb, 2005, intermittently since April 2006. EDSS 6 in 2002, zero after the first 3 months on Lipitor.

Cured of multiple sclerosis, stopped the Wheldon's protocol in Nov,2008. Use only LDN.

Barbara, Are you a Brit? (harbour vs. harbor)

Joyce~caregiver-advocate in Dallas for Steve J (SPMS) / Cpn indicated by reactions; Mpn, EBV, CMV positive; elevated heavy metals; gluten+casein sensitive / Wheldon CAP since Aug. '06 - doxycycline+azithromycin+flagyl pulses; antivirals; chelation; LDN.

Joyce~caregiver-advocate in Dallas for Steve J (SPMS).  CAP since August 06, Cpn, Mpn, B. burgdorferi, systemic candidiasis, EBV, CMV & other herpes family viral infections, elevated heavy metals, gluten+casein sensitivity. 

No, I'm Polish living in the USA. I guess that permits me to write both ways. Just kidding. Barbara.       RRMS changing to SPMS in Nov, 2002 when started Lipitor. The Wheldon protocol since Feb, 2005, intermittently since April 2006. EDSS 6 in 2002, zero after the first 3 months on Lipitor.

Cured of multiple sclerosis, stopped the Wheldon's protocol in Nov,2008. Use only LDN.

Having read much more British literature than American (especially in my younger, intense learning years), I find that some of my own spellings are British. For instance, I tend to use "travelling" and "travelled" instead of "traveling" and "traveled." The "our" vs. "or" word endings would feel very natural to use either way, but I decided long ago to try to spell "American" so I would not be perceived as a phony. Besides, a Texas gal using British spellings is ludicrous.

Joyce~caregiver-advocate in Dallas for Steve J (SPMS) / Cpn indicated by reactions; Mpn, EBV, CMV positive; elevated heavy metals; gluten+casein sensitive / Wheldon CAP since Aug. '06 - doxycycline+azithromycin+flagyl pulses; antivirals; chelation; LDN.

Joyce~caregiver-advocate in Dallas for Steve J (SPMS).  CAP since August 06, Cpn, Mpn, B. burgdorferi, systemic candidiasis, EBV, CMV & other herpes family viral infections, elevated heavy metals, gluten+casein sensitivity. 

 Thanks for evening laugh. I tried to imagine yourself in that role! Very funny! Barbara.       RRMS changing to SPMS in Nov, 2002 when started Lipitor. The Wheldon protocol since Feb, 2005, intermittently since April 2006. EDSS 6 in 2002, zero after the first 3 months on Lipitor.

Cured of multiple sclerosis, stopped the Wheldon's protocol in Nov,2008. Use only LDN.

Well, since writing here and on ThisisMS I have become more aware of the differences in spelling and quite honestly, I think the American way makes more sense, yet I would seem just as phoney as Joyce if I started spelling harbour without a "u" and anaemia or encyclopaedia without an "a"............Sarah

An Itinerary in Light and Shadow.Wheldon regime since August 2003, for very aggressive SPMS.  Intermittent therapy after one year. 2006 still take this, now two weeks every three months.  EDSS was about 7, now 2. United Kingdom.

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.